Most landfills in Johor at full capacity


Photo by Suchen S.K

JOHOR BARU: Most landfills in Johor are severely overloaded and could be shut down at any time, says Tan Hong Pin.

The Local Government, Science and Technology Committee chairman said currently, there were 16 sanitary landfills throughout the state.

“Some of them have reached their limit while several others are almost full.

“We are having a challenging time figuring out ways to resolve the issue, especially at areas in northern Johor as plans for the opening of a landfill in Bukit Payong, Parit Sulung, has been postponed,” he said when met after the SuteraFOLO Farm open day yesterday.

Tan said the landfill in Bukit Payong, which was originally scheduled to be opened in 2020, had to be postponed due to objections from residents.

“We are in the process of identifying suitable areas for rubbish disposal and sanitary landfills, as well as other methods to safely dispose waste materials.

“The state government is also planning to introduce an approach that would involve the community in rubbish disposal, which inclu­des encouraging recycling activities,” he said.

He added that he had also submitted a proposal to the Housing and Local Government Ministry and has been given positive feedback.

“I believe that the call to encourage recycling activities in the community, including recycling food waste that could be used as composite materials in farming, would make a huge difference.

“This is partly because more than half of waste materials being sent to landfills is food waste and recycling it into farming material would help to reduce waste and protect the environment,” he said.

Tan said presently, the sanitary landfill in Seelong, Senai, received some 1,300 tonnes of waste daily while the one in Simpang Renggam, Bakri, received 300 tonnes a day.

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