Ministry thinking of integrating JPJ talk into schools


All smiles: Loke (second from right) and Dr Maszlee (Loke’s right) posing with schoolchildren after launching the PKJR for primary schools at the Putrajaya International Convention Centre. Looking on are Road Safety Department director-general Datuk Rosli Isa and Malaysian Institute of Road Safety Research director Dr Siti Zaharah Ishak. — Bernama

All smiles: Loke (second from right) and Dr Maszlee (Loke’s right) posing with schoolchildren after launching the PKJR for primary schools at the Putrajaya International Convention Centre. Looking on are Road Safety Department director-general Datuk Rosli Isa and Malaysian Institute of Road Safety Research director Dr Siti Zaharah Ishak. — Bernama

PUTRAJAYA: The Transport Ministry is mulling over the idea of integrating the six-hour Road Transport Department (JPJ) talk in driving institutes into schools, says Anthony Loke.

The Transport Minister said presently, the talk was a compulsory requirement for those taking their driving licences.

Loke said if the proposal was implemented, students who have studied the module would be exempted from attending for the talk.

“They can attend the exams right away as it is not practical to learn and understand everything in six hours.

“Perhaps, it can be integrated into the school curriculum because 16 is the legal age to obtain a motorcycle licence,” he told reporters after launching the revised road safety module (PKJR) for primary schools yesterday.

Loke said it would take between one and two years to study the new proposal.

But he was confident that it would be welcomed by students, pointing out that it would change the way they learn about traffic laws.

“What’s important is imparting road safety knowledge,” said Loke.

On the PKJR, Loke said the revised module was more interactive and has been revised in terms of its learning content and graphic illustration.

“We need to see how we can expand the PKJR curriculum into upper secondary by giving more focus to the learning of traffic laws, and not just the concept of road safety.

“The impact cannot be measured immediately because it is about education and changing the people’s attitude,” he said.

Separately, Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said they welcomed innovative and creative ideas.

The PKJR module has been taught in primary schools since 2007 and in lower secondary schools since 2012.

Dr Maszlee said the module was taught over two hours a month.

“I believe it will help in shaping responsible youths,” he said.