ADVERTISEMENT

Dragon babies have come of age


KUALA LUMPUR: The dragon babies are all grown up and ready for college.

A local private university, expecting a surge in placements of 18-year-old students born in the Year of the Dragon, has prepared for it with a general study on their traits.

Those born in the year of that Chinese zodiac animal are driven to achieve success – either in their studies, financial security or mate­rial possession, according to Inti International University & Colleges’ (Inti) survey.

The study was conducted on 315 “dragons” aged 18 and 30 (who were born in the years 1988 and 2000), and those of other zodiacs.

It found that almost half of the dragon babies attributed hard work as the key to their success, instead of relying on inborn advantages.

Believing that dragon babies will bring luck to the family, Asian countries like Singapore, Hong Kong, China and Malaysia have seen birth rates spike during the dragon years.

According to the survey, dragon babies are also a practical lot.

Despite their confidence in secu­ring jobs after graduation, they do worry about the inability to get along with colleagues, having a job that may not meet their expec­tations and low salaries.

Student Amanda Siew, for in­­stance, foresees having to compete with a larger cohort of graduates when entering the workforce.

“Even in primary school I was in a larger-sized class than those in the years before and after me, and often had to compete for tea­chers’ attention.”

She is convinced success comes from a willingness to work hard and to take on opportunities, irres­pective of when one was born.

Having lived in China before, managing director Nur Jeevan Guna Segar is aware of the perceptions towards dragon babies and the qualities tagged on them.

“Many factors influenced who I am today, but being driven and determined are qualities I share with other dragons.

“We take the lead and are always looking forward to what’s next.”

Denise Solosa, mother of 18-year-old Danielle, said Chinese zodiac influenced her decision to have her first child in the year of the dragon.

“All children have their strengths and capabilities, but dragons demonstrate a sense of focus and direction even from a young age, and know early in life what they want.”

Chinese metaphysics consultant Nancy Yeoh (pic) said this year presented dragon babies with the auspicious Month Emptiness star, which encouraged them to have bigger aspirations and to be optimistic.

“This prediction coincides with the findings of the survey which reveals that dragon babies are ambitious and desire greater success in life,” she said, adding that this year would be a good start for all such babies to turn their dreams into reality.

Counselling psychologist Charis Wong said cultural beliefs surrounding the uniqueness of dragon babies might have had an impact on the life of these individuals, whether consciously or subconsciously.

“Some studies have reported that dragon babies stand out in core areas of academic and career achievements, amplified by their effort, hard work and determination to succeed in life.

“Whether or not this is attributed to ingrained traits or nurture a self-fulfilling prophecy, remains an interesting debate.”

dragon babies , INTI

   

ADVERTISEMENT