Govt special taskforce to review existing projects for Indian community


KUALA LUMPUR: The Government’s special taskforce for the Indian community will review all existing projects for Indians when it meets in two weeks’ time.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said this included the Malaysian Indian Blueprint, the brainchild of former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak which was launched with much fanfare last year.

“We will study all the projects and the agencies involved in executing them, and make improvements where we see fit.

“More than ever, the B40 (bottom 40 percent income bracket) need all the help they can get and we must ensure all the initiatives in place reach this group,” he told reporters after launching the inaugural Indian Entrepreneurship Summit 2018 here on Sunday.

Among the issues expected to be raised at the first taskforce meeting are the role of Indian community agencies like the Socioeconomic Development of Indian Community unit (SEDIC), as well as allocations for Indians, that include those under Tekun and the Amanah Saham 1Malaysia.

Previously, community leaders had called for the Government not to scrap the Malaysian Indian Blueprint, saying the initiatives listed were beneficial and should be expounded upon.

Over time, Kulasegaran said the taskforce will also engage community experts and professionals to discuss and resolve the 25 issues affecting the community, listed in Pakatan Harapan’s Buku Jingga.

On another matter, Kulasegaran encouraged Malaysian Indian entrepreneurs to team up with the Government to train community youths, especially from the B40, to follow in their footsteps.

“This summit is a platform for Malaysian Indians to empower themselves, and we hope business owners will not only grow further but help us grow the futute generation of entrepreneurs as well.

“The Pakatan government supports and endorses efforts to spur youth entrepreneurship,” he said.

Kulasegaran also called on training institutes to actively seek new recruits instead of letting people seek them out.

“A lot of these institutes are under utilised, and we should not do things the old way where we sit back and wait for people to enrol.

“Get out there and target the youths to join. Talk to them and show them what they can do with the training offered,” he said.