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Teachers happy with dropping of SKPMg2


PUTRAJAYA: A time-consuming system of determining the quality of schools, which had been a bane of teachers, has been suspended with immediate effect.

“I want their burden to be reduced so that they can focus on educating our students.

“In line with the Government’s promise of reducing teachers’ burden, I have decided to suspend the system,” Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik (pic) said, adding that this was the ministry’s Hari Raya gift to the teachers.

The Standard Kualiti Pendidikan Malaysia Gelombang 2 (SKPMg2) was launched by the ministry’s Inspectorate of Schools in September 2017 to determine the level of achievement and quality of schools.

Under the system, national primary and secondary schools were categorised from Band 1 (top performers) to Band 7 (low performers).

Academic achievement was not the main criterion in the grading; instead, the focus was also on other areas such as school administration and student discipline.

There had been many complaints from teachers about SKPMg2 as it was time-consuming and reduced face time between students and teachers.

Addressing a press conference yesterday, Dr Maszlee said with its suspension, the Inspectorate of Schools and Quality Assurance Council would now carry out training and mentoring exercises when needed.

“Schools that have not been audited will be guided by the council on self-assessment,” he added.

He hoped the schools could self-monitor and deliver their best performance on their own.

SKPMg2 was scheduled to start in October 2017 but was put on hold by then Education Minister Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid after technical problems emerged during the implementation process.

When contacted, an English teacher from Petaling Jaya who wanted to be known as Annie was relieved that the system has been discontinued.

“We can concentrate on teaching. I am pleased that Dr Maszlee has acknowledged the issue of excessive amount of paperwork that teachers have to deal with.”

She said the SKPMg2 involved a lot of paperwork, citing how teachers were required to take a photograph of each class they taught and write a report about it as “evidence”.

“All the documents (assessments) have to be in black and white and filed, while the marks would have to be put in by us into an online system,” she said, adding that storing the files was another hassle as well.

Another teacher who wanted to be known as Raj agreed, saying he hoped the auditing series would be done away for good.

“It was a redundant programme that wasn’t well planned.

“It was burdensome to teachers and had led to loss of time between us and our students,” he said.

National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) secretary-general Harry Tan said: “This is the first step towards the removal of all unnecessary paperwork that reduces teachers’ face time with students.”

   

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