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Sabah fishermen spared Super Typhoon Haiyan’s wrath


KOTA KINABALU: Fishermen here were relieved that Super Typhoon Haiyan, which ravaged the Philip­pines, did not make much impact in the state.

Most of them were able to return to sea despite an earlier warning by the Malaysian Meteorological De­­partment of severe weather conditions due to the super typhoon.

Kudat Fishermen Association chairman Jais Hassan said the weather in the northern regions was generally calm, except for intermittent rain.

“We are able to go out to sea to fish. This is a good sign for fishermen,” he said when contacted yesterday.

He said that while the weather was gloomy, there was no indication so far that something worse was going to hit the area.

“We hope the effects of this typhoon will not be felt too much here as that will impact our livelihood,” he added.

Likewise, Sandakan Fishermen Association chairman Asnaul Gindong said the weather in the area did not show any sign of danger resulting from the super typhoon.

“However, we are on full alert and will take the necessary steps should the situation change for the worse,” he said.

Asnaul said the association was relieved that most fishermen were able to go out to sea yesterday despite a slight drizzle.

Typhoon Haiyan, possibly the strongest typhoon ever to hit land, slammed into central Philippines on Friday, causing massive damage to properties.

Over 100 people were killed and many more injured.

The Category 5 super typhoon is now barrelling out of the Philippines towards Vietnam.

It has weakened to Category 4 after making several landfalls in the Philippines.

However, forecasters said it could strengthen again over the South China Sea.

Vietnam is now making prepa­rations in anticipation of the ty­­phoon.

Authorities in 15 provinces in Vietnam have started to call back boats and prepare for possible landslides. Nearly 300,000 people were evacuated to safer areas in Da Nang and Quang Nam provinces alone.

Government , typhoon , ssabah

   

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