Ministry can search homes


  • Nation
  • Sunday, 08 Jun 2003

Compiled by Shantini Suntharajah

HOUSE RAIDS (June 7): The Home Ministry will go ahead and raid private homes for pornographic and pirated VCDs. Deputy Home Minister Chor Chee Heung said the officers did not require warrants to enter private homes because they had adequate powers to do so if they had reliable information that the number of illegal and pornographic VCDs stored in the premises merited such an action. 

 

THREE-TERM LIMIT (June 1): MCA president Datuk Seri Ong Ka Ting has pledged to work towards limiting the party presidency to a maximum of three consecutive terms. MCA leaders welcomed the proposal to set a term limit on the ministerial posts held by party leaders but want more in-depth discussions on the matter.  

 

VCD SWOOP (June 5): A massive operation codenamed Ops Benteras to wipe out the sale of pirated and pornographic VCDs was launched on Wednesday night in several parts of the Klang Valley. The raids are part of an effort to meet today's deadline set by Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Norian Mai to cripple the illegal industry.  

 

27,000 TO BE PAID (June 4): The Education Ministry has assured the more than 27,000 Mathematics, Science and English teachers in Year One, Form One and Lower Six that they would receive the incentive payment due to them as announced, regardless of the number of periods taught.  

 

ECONOMY RESPONDING (June 3): There were signs that the economy has responded positively to the stimulus package announced by the Government some two weeks back, Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi said. The rise of the Composite Index of the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange (KLSE) was a positive indicator, as investor confidence seemed to be returning. Nevertheless, Abdullah said it was still too early to experience the full effects of the stimulus package.  

 

SUSPENDED (June 4): Ampang Jaya Municipal Council enforcement chief Capt (R) Abdul Kudus Ahmad has been suspended for a month pending an internal inquiry over claims that he was involved in corrupt practices and that he was declared a bankrupt eight years ago.  

 

ENFORCEMENT WOES (June 5): The Cabinet has expressed serious concern over enforcement problems and the level of efficiency in many local governments and wanted immediate steps taken to rectify the situation. The Special Cabinet Committee on Good Governance will meet to discuss the problems. 

 

OFFICERS ADVISED (June 6): Law enforcement officers should stick to the boundary of their duties, said Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi. He said they could avoid making mistakes and embarrassing themselves and the Government if they limited themselves to the task at hand and not stray into other areas. 

 

BOOST PRODUCTIVITY (June 7): Yang di-Pertuan Agong Tuanku Syed Sirajuddin Syed Putra Jamalullail has advised the people, in his birthday speech, to continue improving productivity to make the economy stronger and more competitive. He said this was important, as the economy had been affected by the Iraq war and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome outbreak.  

 

RELEASED (June 2): The Home Ministry has decided not to extend the detention order on four people who were detained under the Internal Security Act 1960, said the ministry's secretary-general Datuk Seri Aseh Che Mat. The four detainees are Parti Keadilan Nasional Youth head Mohamed Ezam Mohamed Noor, activist Hishamudin Rais, Keadilan vice president Tian Chua and Jemaah Islamiah Malaysia president Saari Sungib. 

 

BIOVALLEY PROJECT (June 5): Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Mahathir Mohamad has asked Japan to help in the BioValley project, which he said would benefit not only Malaysia but also the rest of the world. He said the project, which would involve scientific areas like life science and research on food, could not be developed by Malaysia alone. 

 

EXAM DATES CHANGED (June 7): The Ujian Pencapaian Sekolah Rendah examination has been moved to Sept 15, 17 and 18, causing an uproar among parents who are questioning the Education Ministry’s rationale for moving the exam until after the mid-term school break. Initially scheduled for Sept 2 to Sept 4, the UPSR exam date was moved because of a public holiday in Johor that was not announced until after the first examination schedule was set.  

 

OPEN DURING LUNCH (June 4): The National Registration Department has directed all its branches to stay open during lunch breaks if necessary to serve the public.  

 

NEWLYWEDS PACKAGE (June 1): The Women and Family Development Ministry launched a Smart Start package targeted at newlyweds to give them an early start in nurturing a strong marriage in conjunction with National Family Day 2003. To test run the programme, a group of 124 newly married couples of various ethnic backgrounds have been selected by the ministry. They will remain the focus group for one year.  

 

NEW EPF CENTRES (June 2): The EPF has opened four new service centres at KL International Airport, Kuala Selangor, Nibong Tebal and Beaufort.  

 

MALAYSIA PRAISED (June 3): The International Monetary Fund has praised Malaysia, Brazil and Mexico for their financial management and reform of their financial institutions, said Datuk Seri Dr Mahathir Mohamad. The Prime Minister said the banks had been recapitalised and made more transparent and non-performing loans had been dealt with. This has generally improved the business climate in Malaysia. 

 

 

 

RESTORING TIES (June 1): Leaders of the world's most powerful nations converged on the French Alpine resort of Evian under tight security for the G8 Summit. G8 leaders traditionally use their annual summit to assess the state of the global economy and make recommendations aimed at bolstering worldwide growth.  

 

SUU KYI ARRESTED (June 1): Myanmar’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been put under temporary arrest in the country’s north after a violent clash between her supporters and a pro-junta group which left four dead, the junta said last Saturday. On Friday, UN envoy Tan Sri Razali Ismail arrived in Myanmar to try to meet detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, hours after Washington said she had been the victim of a “premeditated ambush” by a mob linked to the ruling military junta. 

 

PROTEST AT G8 (June 2): Tens of thousands of anti-globalisation protestors set off on marches last Sunday, as French police fired tear gas to stop demonstrators blocking a road to a resort hosting a summit of world leaders. Carrying anti-war banners and beating drums, some 1,500 protestors tried to block a road near the town of Thonon, the route for some delegations heading for the Group of Eight summit in the lakeside spa of Evian.  

 

BLOCKADE LIFTED (June 2): Israel eased its closure of the Palestinian territories three days ahead of a US-convened peace summit and amid expectations the two sides could declare a long-sought truce. However, a senior Israeli official said the two sides failed to reach an understanding on a planned joint statement to be published at the end of the three-way summit.  

 

NUCLEAR FUEL SUPPLY (June 6): Russia said on Thursday that it would supply nuclear fuel to Iran even if it failed to allow stricter UN inspections in a move defying international concerns. 

 

STILL NO WEAPONS (June 1): The United States on Friday announced a major expansion of so-far fruitless efforts to find chemical and biological arms in Iraq, forming a team of 1,400 US, British and Australian experts to take up the hunt.  

 

PLEDGE AT G8 (June 4): World leaders closed the G8 summit on Tuesday by pledging to rebuild Iraq and combat the threat of nuclear weapons in Iran and North Korea. 

 

IRELAND SOFTENS BAN (June 5): Some athletes from Canada and China can travel to Ireland to take part in this month's Special Olympics, the government announced on Wednesday night in a partial reversal of its original plan to bar all delegates from SARS-struck countries. 

 

DETAINEES ABUSED (June 4): Many immigrants rounded up after the Sept 11 attacks were chained, physically and verbally abused, held without bail and denied access to lawyers, according to a Justice Department report released on Monday.  

 

BLAIR UNDER FIRE (June 5): British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced a parliamentary inquiry into the case his government made for attacking Iraq as he sought to crush claims he hyped up weapons evidence to justify war. Blair pledged to co-operate with the probe by parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee.  

 

ON TRIAL (June 3) Imam Samudra, 33, went on trial for his life on Monday, accused of masterminding the deadly Bali bomb attacks that prosecutors say were part of a plan to wage war on the United States.  

 

FIGHTING AIDS (June 3): African leaders won a promise of US$1bil (RM3.8bil) a year from the European Union for the fight against AIDS after joining the opening day on Sunday of the G8 Summit of the world's most powerful nations.  

 

STRIKES IN FRANCE (June 4): For the second time in three weeks, French air traffic, railway and public transport workers went on strike on Tuesday to protest the government's pension reform proposal, disrupting travel throughout the country.  

 

SEARCH FOR TRUTH (June 6): US President George W. Bush vowed to uncover the truth about Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, whose failure to show up so far has embarrassed war ally British Prime Minister Tony Blair. But Bush hinted it could be a long and difficult search. 

 

UN INSPECTORS (June 7): Security Council members, including Britain, tried to convince the United States on Thursday to allow UN arms inspectors back into Iraq, but failed. The US and Britain have not found unconventional weapons after 11 weeks of searching. This has developed into a political issue in both countries with the Bush administration defending intelligence used to justify the war.  

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