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Growth on the fast lane


Adlina Syazlin says it was her father’s encouragement that inspired her to pursue her studies in automotive engineering.

Adlina Syazlin says it was her father’s encouragement that inspired her to pursue her studies in automotive engineering.

ADLINA Syazlin Faizul (pic) attributes her interest for automotive engineering to women who shattered the glass ceiling in male dominated industries.

“The fact that it is a traditionally male dominated industry intimidated me in the beginning.

“When I started my Diploma in Automotive Service and Technology, I had zero knowledge and exposure to the industry.

“However, the intimidation fueled my determination to do my best and come out on top.

“Gender should not be a barrier for women from becoming successful engineers,” said the 21-year-old.

The recent diploma graduate from DRB-Hicom University of Automotive Malaysia (DHU) lived up to her words when she was awarded with the Chancellor Award with a CGPA of 3.98 in July.

While women such as strategy engineer Ruth Buscombe and former racing driver Susie Wolff were influential characters in Adlina Syazlin’s life, she stressed that it was ultimately her father’s encouragement that inspired her to pursue her studies in automotive engineering.

Her father wanted to pursue an automotive course but could not do so as there were less opportunities to do so in the past.

“My father constantly updates himself on the latest automotive technology and innovations. I got my support, motivation and inspiration from him.

“Through me, he is able to fulfil his lifelong ambition,” she said, adding that her father is a managing director of a shipping company.

Reflecting on her academic journey so far, Adlina Syazlin said time management is crucial and played a significant role in her ability to ace her diploma.

“Procrastination was one of my biggest challenges in effectively managing my time.”

For Adlina Syazlin, the skills she learnt during her time at the university and her training at automotive manufacturer Audi in Glenmarie gave her a better understanding of the service operation and a look into the different methods of industrial training.

“Getting to know and see first-hand the mechanics and technology of the different car models has given me a different perspective into the making of a car.

“Many parts of a car are interchangeable, but every car has its own unique feature,” she explained.

Her passion for the field is evident as Adlina Syazlin hoopes to put Malaysia’s automotive products on par with global standards.

“I want to be able to bring Malaysia up to that position,” she said.

   

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