Two degrees for one extra year


IN the current tight employment situation, it helps when graduates are multi-skilled and have added knowledge in various fields.  

The Bachelor of Business programme offered by Taylor’s Business School (TBS) in association with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) allows students to graduate with an extra degree in computing.  

Students can get the extra degree by just studying one more year at UTS in Australia. 

TBS chief operating officer Ooi Chee Kok said business students who would otherwise graduate after the third year could obtain a Bachelor of Computing in the fourth year at UTS. 

“A year at UTS offers state-of-the-art facilities besides giving students a wonderful overseas experience,” Ooi said in a recent interview. 

He said: “The Bachelor of Computing awarded by the Faculty of Information Technology of UTS provides students sound knowledge in all aspects of computing and IT which the graduate can apply in business and other situations. 

“This means the student will learn data management, information systems management, internetworking, software engineering and systems development.” 

To be eligible for the second degree, students (in the business degree programme) are encouraged to choose information technology as their first major followed by a second major in areas such as accounting, marketing, banking, international business, sports management, tourism, human resources management or advertising. 

“The combined degree programme starts next month for TBS students while students already in the business degree who are taking the IT major are eligible to take the combined degree,” Ooi said, adding that the proposed final year fees are A$8,500 (RM18,275) per semester. 

SPM school-leavers interested in pursuing the double degree are encouraged to begin with the business foundation for one year. Currently TBS is offering scholarships to school-leavers.  

For enquiries, call 03-5637 1150 or e-mail admissions@tbs.edu.my. – By Y.S. LIM 

o TAYLOR'S Business School, which has a strong affiliation with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), sent five students recently to the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) in a student cultural exchange programme (see pix). 

“This was to provide our students an opportunity to experience and learn about the different cultures of our neighbouring countries,” said TBS student services manager Angela Pok. 

Lau Wei Kwan, Hor May Nie, Loh Mun Yee, Chan Li Kuen and Hue Vern Harn were enthusiastic ambassadors for Malaysia, promoting its cultures and traditions.  

Dressed in traditional Malaysian costumes, they briefed their university counterparts on places of interest in Malaysia, and showed photos of the country's festivals and food.  

At the end of the presentation, they distributed muruku and other Malaysian goodies to their audience. 

The Malaysians were each paired with a local host who took them to Mongkok Road, Lantau Island, Ocean Park and Victoria Peak on a sightseeing and shopping spree. They were also interviewed on campus radio.  

Lau, who enjoyed the cultural exchange programme, said she looked forward to visits to other Asean universities in the future.  

HKUST shares many similarities with UTS, especially in research-based learning whereby students are exposed to independent and creative learning, whether it be through coursework or in real-life situations.  

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