Rectifying high-risk sites


  • Community
  • Monday, 05 Jan 2015

Reinforced: DBKL has built a crib wall in Taman Salak Jaya to strengthen the slope.

LOCAL authorities are focusing their attention on slopes, especially during this rainy season.

Most are spending large funds to prevent slope failures by thinking many steps ahead and conducting strengthening works in areas prone to and at risk of landslips.

Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) Public Works and Drainage Department director Tan Keng Chok said in DBKL’s Budget 2015, it would be focusing on Segambut.

“According to the Kuala Lumpur Slope Information System (KuLSIS), Segambut has 713 high-risk slopes.

“Most of the slopes are in Kampung Sg Penchala and we will be performing strengthening works at government and road reserves with the money.

“For private land, we will send notices to the landowners to engage their own consultants and contractors to rectify the slopes,” he said.

However, he said most would take a longer time to take the necessary action.

“After serving the notice and if the slope is endangering the safety of lives and adjoining properties, especially in housing areas and roads, we can move in to carry out the necessary rectification.

“We will then recover the costs from the private owners,” he said.

No easy task: Tan says one of the main challenges faced by DBKL is controlling road excavation works by utility companies in the city.
Larger fund this year: Tan says DBKL has set aside RM25mil for remedial and slope-strengthening works this year. - filepic

He said if the slope failure was minor and not life-threatening, owners would be given more time to engage contractors to rectify the failed slope.

DBKL has set aside RM25mil for remedial and slope-strengthening works in 2015, a 92.3% increase from 2014’s budget, which was RM13 mil.

“We are setting up a larger budget for 2015 as we are taking more proactive measures to rectify and strengthen high-risk slopes identified in KuLSIS,” he said.

KuLSIS provides a 360°, 3D-view of the capital’s topography.

Among the data in the system are rivers, roads, geology and rain distribution in Kuala Lumpur.

According to KuLSIS 1,740 high-risk slopes have been identified out of the 3,299 slopes in Kuala Lumpur.

He also said DBKL’s rescue squad was on standby around the clock.

“They will respond immediately as soon as calls are received by DBKL,” he said.

Tan said the completed strengthening works in 2014, which cost RM6.3 mil, were at Jalan Changkat Persekutuan, Bukit Persekutuan; Jalan Persiaran Sultan Salahuddin; and Lebuhraya Mahameru.

Ongoing projects, costing a whopping RM52.6 mil, are in Taman Supreme; Jalan Ampang; Bukit Nanas; Taman Setiawangsa; Taman Bukit Anggerik, Cheras; Jalan Tuba, Kampung Attap; Lorong Setiabistari, Bukit Damansara; Taman Salak Jaya; and Jalan Changkat Tunku, Bukit Tunku.

Ampang Jaya Municipal Council (MPAJ) Hillslope Development and Maintenance Division chief Zafrul Fazry Mohd Fauzi, who is an engineer, said the council had identified 28 locations with high-risk slopes and was monitoring all of it.

More needed: Zafrul Fazry says MPAJ needs RM20mil this year to conduct strengthening works but the council is uncertain if it can get the necessary funds. — filepic
More needed: Zafrul Fazry says MPAJ needs RM20mil this year to conduct strengthening works but the council is uncertain if it can get the necessary funds. — filepic

Among the locations were Bukit Antarabangsa; Kemensah, Hulu Kelang; Bukit Sg Seputeh, Lembah Jaya; and Bukit Permai.

He said MPAJ had completed slope-stabilising works at six locations including Taman Saga, Taman Bukit Teratai and Bukit Antarabangsa in 2014.

“There are seven ongoing stabilising projects at locations including Taman Keramat, Taman Zoo View, Taman Ukay Perdana, Lembah Jaya, Taman Bukit Permai and Taman Bukit Permai,” he said, adding that MPAJ had forked out RM1.7mil for the 13 projects.

He said MPAJ had set aside RM2.5 mil to carry out maintenance work, including clearing and repairing blocked or clogged drains and clearing trees.

However, he said the funds were not enough to conduct the necessary, and bigger, strengthening works as the bills were too high for MPAJ to cover so it had to borrow funds from the state government.

DBKL is installing beam grids and performed soil nailing to strengthen a slope Jalan Tuba at Kg Attap.
Work in progress: DBKL is installing beam grids and performed soil nailing to strengthen a slope Jalan Tuba at Kg Attap.

“So far, we have had to borrow RM2.17mil from the state government for stabilising works for five completed projects and RM2.4 mil for geotechnical research on six slopes,” he said.

He said according to the data, MPAJ needed RM20mil this year to conduct strengthening works in Bukit Antarabangsa, Taman Melawati, Ukay Perdana, Taman Zoo View, Ukay Heights and Taman Bukit Permai.

“But we are uncertain if we can get the necessary funds to do all this,” he said.

Meanwhile, Subang Jaya Municipal Council (MPSJ) is maintaining and monitoring 21 high-risk slopes in Taman Puncak Jalil, Seri Kembangan, Bandar Kinrara, Pusat Bandar Puchong, Taman Damai Utama, Putra Heights and Bandar Puchong Jaya.

“We are currently conducting strengthening works at two locations — Taman Universiti Indah in Seri Kembangan and the Beringin Flats in Puchong,” said MPSJ corporate communications officer Muhammad Azli Miswan.

He said during this rainy season, the local authority would be focusing more efforts on monitoring high-risk slopes.

“Our maintenance contractors have been ordered to be well-equipped with the necessary tools to carry out temporary works to control slope erosion,” he said.

Related story:

Public can report slope failures to community-based organisation

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