Crafting time out of MCO


  • Metro News
  • Wednesday, 27 May 2020

Ahmad Fikri replanting the coral vines in a spot where he plans to build an arch.

MOVEMENT control order has forced people to spend most of their time at home.

Although many are required to work from home, they still have spare energy at the end of the workday since there is no time wasted or being stressed out by the commute to and from work.

It is not surprising that many have made the most of their time at home by completing long-standing projects.

Among those people is mother-of-two Yap Sin Jien from Seremban, Negri Sembilan, who stumbled upon the cardboard box that she has saved since 2014 for future art and craft projects.

The former preschool teacher had quit her job after giving birth to her second child in December. She is now a full-time homemaker.

“Now that I have gained back my strength and while my husband is at home so he can look after the children, I decided to clean the storeroom. That was when I found this box. It had contained the ceiling fan we bought for our new house back then.

“The cardboard box was thick and of good quality. As I am big on recycling and I love making crafts, I kept the box in the storeroom for later use but forgot all about it.” she said.

Yap, 34, said she had been looking online to purchase a small bookcase for her three-year-old son.

“I came across a DIY project to build one with cardboard boxes.”

She said while working as a preschool teacher, she was required

to come up with weekly art-and-craft activities, which she truly enjoyed.

And this DIY bookcase seemed to be up her alley.

“All I needed was tape to put the cut-up pieces together. My husband wrapped the pieces in coloured paper to make it look nicer.

“It was rather easy and I am surprised with the result.

“Since children’s books are not thick, the cardboard shelves can hold the weight.

“My son is excited about his new ‘mini library’,” she said, adding that she had a few more good quality cardboard boxes waiting to be turned into something else.

Finance specialist from Gombak, Kuala Lumpur, Jeeva Ramasamy, 34, found the time to repurpose her old jeans into shorts.

“I have a few pairs of jeans that are worn out but still wearable.

“They do not look good anymore but I do not have the heart to throw them away even though I do not wear them out anymore.

“I saw the many ideas online for repurposing old jeans but I had been procrastinating.

“With so much time on my hands recently, I decided to finally get on the project.

“Turning them into shorts is the easiest and that will be useful because I frequently wear shorts at home,” she said.

Jeeva said sewing was a big deal for her as she did not have a sewing machine and had to do it by hand.

“I have only done some sewing once; I made a pocket for my favourite pair of shorts.

“So, this was my second sewing project.

“It looks easy but the work has to be neat, and that is the challenge. I have just completed one. With the balance material, I am going to make batu seremban,” she said.

(Batu seremban is a traditional game involving five small stones, which are often replaced with miniature beanbags for comfort’s sake.)

Journalist Jay Jayaraj, 40, had been catching up on a lot of her long-standing projects during the MCO, including finishing a cross-stitch work that she started more than 10 years ago!

“The pattern was taken off a 40-year-old pattern book that belonged to my mother.

“I was almost done with the cross-stitch when I was distracted and somehow forgot about it. I also moved abroad for a couple of years and dabbled in many forms of arts and activities,” said the Selayang resident.

She planned to turn the cross-stitch piece into a cushion cover as a gift to her mother.

“Once the MCO is lifted, I will get it sewn onto a cushion cover and give it to my mother who lives in Ipoh.

“I have the time and space presently to complete other unfinished crafts too, besides thinking of new ones and organising my space among various projects,” added Jay.

Online marketer Ahmad Fikri Mastor, 29, from Sepang said he finally had time to replant the coral vine that was growing wild in his garden.

“I planted the flowering creeper to grow on my perimeter fence five years ago, with the intention of feeding a colony of stingless bees that I planned to have. The stingless bee project failed, and I just left the vine to grow.

“I haven’t had the time to prune it properly over the last few years and it was starting to climb up my mulberry tree.

“Although I am still working from home, the work load is lighter and I have more time on my hands.

“So, I removed the creepers from the fence and replanted it nearby with the idea of building an entrance arch for it to climb,” he said.

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