Local and foreign artists feature terrestrial and aquatic species in their artworks at exhibition


  • Metro News
  • Thursday, 18 Oct 2018

The bond shared by elephant parents and their young represented in Alice Chang’s oil piece, ‘Love II’.

THE majesty of wildlife was evident to all who visited WWF-Malaysia’s Art for Nature 2018 exhibition in Gurney Paragon Mall, Penang.

Species both terrestrial and aquatic were beautifully portrayed in most of the 65 featured artworks done by 19 local and foreign artists.

Captivating many were the incredibly realistic digital paintings by Rachel Gray, a Briton who has travelled extensively across Southeast Asia to photograph wildlife.

The imagery she captured inspires her animal portraits. Displayed at the show were pieces depicting a panda, lion, zebra and a pair of giraffes.

Christine Das’ acrylic paintings had a dreamier feel, with gradient hues and flowy lines coalescing into tigers and owls.

Primates like the dusky leaf monkey and orangutan were the focus of Nasir Nadzir’s works done with pens and colour pencils.

Choy Meng Fong’s ‘Loving’, painted with acrylic on canvas, captures a tender moment in the animal kingdom.
Choy Meng Fong’s ‘Loving’, painted with acrylic on canvas, captures a tender moment in the animal kingdom.

Families of elephants were caught in tender moments in oil paintings which Alice Chang put up for the week-long exhibition that ended recently.

The show was held in conjunction with World Animal Day which fell on Oct 4, and presented in collaboration with Island Gallery and The Art Gallery.

It was the latest of a series of annual charity art exhibitions held in support of WWF-Malaysia since 1997, and the fourth to be held in Penang.

Half of the proceeds raised went towards WWF-Malaysia’s conservation efforts, according to the organisation’s director of marketing, communications and major donor engagement Dominic Wong.

At its earlier opening ceremony, Wong called for more attention to be focused on the plight of the country’s endangered wildlife.

“We have much in common with our wildlife, which demonstrate many admirable qualities such as courage, resilience and an ability to nurture.

Nasir Nadzir’s ‘Memory of Orangutan’, done with ink and colour pencils.
Nasir Nadzir’s ‘Memory of Orangutan’, done with ink and colour pencils.

“Wild animals play important roles in keeping the forests that all life on Earth depend on to be healthy. For example, as an apex predator, tigers ensure that the forest ecosystem is in balance.

“Thus by saving wildlife, we are not only safeguarding a natural treasure for our children and their children after them, but also protecting our forests and indirectly safeguarding our own survival,” Wong stressed.

State Tourism Development, Heritage, Culture and Arts Committee chairman Yeoh Soon Hin launched the exhibition.

Also present were Hunza Group founder Datuk Seri Khor Teng Tong and executive director Khor Tze Ming.

The other artists featured were Loh Kooi Long, Apple Yong, Teoh Han Hoon, Lee Min Gan, Sim Sia Fern, Loh Ban Thatt, Kam Lok Yan, Yeap Tho Seng, Lim Kung Chooi, Datuk Dr Kang Chin Seng, Choy Meng Foong, Lee Joo For, Koay Seng Tat, Ooi Soon Ee, Shen Ying and Wang Xiao Ling.

 

A pair of giraffes depicted in Gray’s digital painting, titled ‘Duo’. — Photos: JEREMY TAN/The Star
A pair of giraffes depicted in Gray’s digital painting, titled ‘Duo’. — Photos: JEREMY TAN/The Star


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