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Educating youths for a resounding ‘yes‘ to palm oil


An international APU student inking his pledge. — Photos: AZHAR MAHFOF/The Star

An international APU student inking his pledge. — Photos: AZHAR MAHFOF/The Star

ABOUT 60 volunteers from around the globe came together to support the Say Yes to Palm Oil awareness campaign at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) in Serdang, Selangor.

The campaign, initiated by YouthsToday in collaboration with Asia Pacific University (APU) and youth-run non-profit organisation AIESEC, is aimed at educating local and international students on the significance and value of palm oil.

YouthsToday chief executive officer and founder Jazz Tan Yee Mei said it was crucial to identify their target group to ensure optimal impact.

“Awareness begins with education and for education to take place, discussions about the subject is required.

(From left) Rainbow of Life Forces‘ Guenwoong Chung, CreatiVision D. C. Sdn Bhd managing director Adelyn Lim, AIESEC president Rick Kit Lee, Achievers Malaysia managing director Dr Anura Gunawardana and AIESEC incoming global volunteer and YouthsToday representative Meliza Savira throwing their support behind the event.
(From left) Rainbow of Life Forces‘ Guenwoong Chung, CreatiVision D. C. Sdn Bhd managing director Adelyn Lim, AIESEC president Rick Kit Lee, Achievers Malaysia managing director Dr Anura Gunawardana and AIESEC incoming global volunteer and YouthsToday representative Meliza Savira throwing their support behind the event.

“We hope such initiatives will serve as a platform for exchange of information.

“Youths are our future as they have the capacity to influence others,” she said.

She added that the initiative was also an effort to oppose the palm oil ban by the European Union.

“Most people think that continuous palm oil extraction and production will result in unending tree-cutting, which will harm the environment.

“What people don’t know is that palm oil can be yielded three to four times a year.

Youths taking the opportunity to visit the booths at the event.
Youths taking the opportunity to visit the booths at the event.

“We are not cutting more trees, but optimising the yield,” she pointed out.

The half-day event saw a large crowd of students visiting various booths set up by AIESEC to encourage its Global Village programme.

Global Village by AIESEC is intended to present potential volunteers, aged between 18 and 30 years, the opportunities to experience different cultures and expand their horizons in a six-week exchange programme abroad involving community projects.

Among the exhibitors at the event were representatives from China, Egypt, Indonesia, Taiwan, Portugal, Tunisia, Morocco, Canada, Vietnam and Malaysia.

A host of activities were held, including traditional games and performances, as well as food stalls.

   

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