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Edible glutinous jewels for dessert







The interior of the Atap food court in Klang, which is along Persiaran Raja Muda Musa.

The interior of the Atap food court in Klang, which is along Persiaran Raja Muda Musa.

THOSE who grew up in the Port Klang area will most likely know of a tang yuan (glutinous rice balls) stall, which now operates at the Atap food court along Persiaran Raja Muda Musa in Klang.

Operated by a father and daughter team, the comforting dessert satisfies the cravings of customers who look forward to the hot ginger soup which helps warm the stomach.

Having been in business for more than 30 years now, the family business has been passed down through the generations and continues to thrive in other parts of Klang town.

A chat with the owner while waiting for my order of tang yuan revealed that the soft yet chewy glutinous rice balls are made fresh daily using a family recipe, which is of course, a secret. Filled with two types of fillings, either peanut or black sesame, these glutinous delights melt in the mouth as soon as you bite into them.

On rainy nights or whenever I am in the mood for something comforting, this is my go-to stall.

A bowl of big and small tang yuan for those who want to try a variety.
A bowl of big and small tang yuan for those who want to try a variety.  

The ginger soup soothes my tummy and the tasty tang yuan balls are edible jewels to look forward to.

Those who abstain from sugar can request for the sugar-free version, or even for a bowl with less sugar in it.

There is no limit to how many chewy balls one can have in their bowl of ginger soup as each big ball with filling costs RM1.20 while smaller ones without filling cost RM2.20 per serve.

You can even have both options in your order but I, personally, love the peanut-filled ones. Known as Tang Yuan Port Klang, the stall is not difficult to find as it is the second stall on your right as you enter the food court.

Black sesame filling in this bowl of hot ginger soup.
Black sesame filling in this bowl of hot ginger soup.

Although I did not grow up eating tang yuan at this particular stall, my dad who used to live in Port Klang in his younger days told me about it and how he frequently visited the stall.

The stall owner told me they stopped operating for about nine years because more and more people had moved out of Port Klang.

Even their loyal customers from Subang Jaya or Petaling Jaya stopped visiting them due to traffic congestion and development in town.

So they closed shop. Then they went back into business after nine years because the family decided it was time to be back in the food scene and offer locals a taste of their family recipe.

Now, apart from this place, the family has two other stalls which are located along Jalan Meru (operated by the owner’s wife) and in a food court behind Public Bank in Bukit Tinggi (operated by the owner’s mother-in-law).

There are no fixed closing days for any of the stalls. However, the family will decide to close for a day or two when they are away on holiday or if there is a family emergency.

Their upcoming closure is on Oct 18, for 10 days.

The stall is open every day from 6pm to 11pm.

Crunchy peanut filling in the tang yuan is the writer’s personal favourite when opting for the dessert.
Crunchy peanut filling in the tang yuan is the writer’s personal favourite when opting for the dessert. 

Central Region

   

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