Bridging generational gap in Taman Bukit Maluri


Skipping, ‘fishing bottle‘ (pic) and ‘old bicycle rim‘ were a few in the long line of fun old-fashioned games played during Taman Bukit Maluri Residents Association‘s Lala Lila Tampung event.

A RHYMING ditty sung while hands are swayed from side to side signals the start of a childhood game, one of many that are slowly fading with time in the rise of technology and digital games.

In hopes of keeping these traditions alive, Taman Bukit Maluri Residents Association (TBMRA) held its Lala Lila Tampung childhood games carnival.

Sixteen traditional games were played by some 400 people of all ages during the event at the neighbourhood field in Jalan Burung Kasawari.

The games included favourites such as hopscotch and batu seremban as well as skipping and playing with marbles or stones.

There were also some residents making paper planes and shooting rubber bands.

A group playing Lala Lila Tampung or ‘lat tali lat‘ at the event.
A group playing Lala Lila Tampung or ‘lat tali lat‘ at the event.

The event ran from 8am to noon and at the end of it, prizes were given out to winners who took part in the games.

TBMRA chairman Ng Kok Piew said the event, now in its third year, was not only to refresh the memory of these games among seniors and strengthen family ties.

“More importantly, it is to provide younger generations with insight into the games their parents invented back in the day by simply using household items around them and their imagination.

“Four years ago, a few retirees and I were talking about the different games and how they were no longer played and we decided it was time we did something about it.

A young resident trying out the ‘Coconut Walk‘.
A young resident trying out the ‘Coconut Walk‘.

“We made a few trips to Ipoh and Old Klang Road to look for some of these traditional games and find out what others used to play before holding the first event in 2015.

“To us, it was about bridging the generational gap by letting youths know how we spent our childhood,” he said, reminiscing about catching spiders in his youth.

“We spent a lot of our effort recollecting how they used to be played and then put them in writing.

“Hopefully, the event will be able to bring generations and the interracial cultures in Malaysia together through nostalgic memories,” he said, adding that they were looking forward to making the event an annual one that continues for years to come.

Ng also said the group was open to suggestions for other old-fashioned games from way back.


   

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