Irked by sight of abandoned vehicles


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  • Saturday, 10 Jun 2017

Tagged but not removed: Shah Alam City Council has left notices on abandoned vehicles in Taman Sri Muda but there is no indication when they will be towed away or removed.

ABANDONED vehicles are an eyesore and unfortunately they are an all-too-common sight in the Klang Valley.

Unwanted vehicles are left to rot in both residential and commercial areas, and the local authorities are having a tough time trying to resolve this menace mainly due to the red tape hurdle they have to overcome before they are able to tow the cars away.

Residents and traders in Shah Alam and Kuala Lumpur want the local authorities to take immediate action against individuals and workshops who park these vehicles “permanently” in public parking spots and by the road shoulders.

This abandoned car in Pudu has been turned into an impromptu dumpsite.

This abandoned car in Pudu has been turned into an impromptu dumpsite.

Some even leave these damaged vehicles on the road dividers.

Case in point is the vehicle that was left to rot in a commercial area in Taman Sri Muda, Shah Alam for more than a year.

As you drive along Jalan Mesra 25/66, you will pass by an old car, stripped of its seats, gearbox, door and materials lining the doors.

Left bare and exposed, the shell of a vehicle traps water in its interior every time it rains.

There are many other areas where cars have been abandoned, such as along Jalan Tekun 25/43 and Jalan Ikhlas 25/38 in Taman Sri Muda.

Heng urged DBKL to tow the abandoned cars in Pudu.

Heng urged DBKL to tow the abandoned cars in Pudu.

Taman Sri Muda Zone A Residents Association chairman T. Mogan said he had sent many complaints to the area councillor on the matter over the years.

“The only time Shah Alam City Council (MBSA) came to tow the abandoned vehicles from this area was about two years ago but this particular vehicle along Jalan Mesra has not been taken away.”

He said that following public complaints, MBSA officers turned up to post notices on the abandoned vehicles but that was about the only action taken so far.

Mogan said these vehicles would collect water whenever it rained, which could then be an ideal spot for mosquitoes to breed.

Resident S. Raj said the council had cleared away the abandoned cars from his neighbourhood.

Damaged old cars take up much-needed parking bays at the commercial area where workshops are aplenty at Taman Sri Muda, Shah Alam. —Photos: Ricky Lai and Sam Tham/The Star

Damaged old cars take up much-needed parking bays at the commercial area where workshops are aplenty at Taman Sri Muda, Shah Alam. —Photos: Ricky Lai and Sam Tham/The Star

However, some residents who live adjacent to the commercial areas that have workshops, are not as lucky as their parking spots are taken up by the workshops which use the public space to leave abandoned or damaged vehicles.

“It is unfair to residents to have to give up their space to them but nothing is being done to resolve this problem.

“I am fed up with the situation.

“Sometimes I feel like people living in Taman Sri Muda are a forgotten lot.”

Councillor Ruthira Surasan said the council had to make a police report regarding the abandoned vehicles before taking further action.

“They can only place a notice and later tow it after they receive authorisation from the police.”

Ruthira said that when she approached council enforcement officers, she was told that some vehicles were not towed because the council was not given authorisation and even if they were allowed to tow the vehicle, the depot was already full.

A shell of a van is left to rust next to a kindergarten in Taman Sri Muda.

A shell of a van is left to rust next to a kindergarten in Taman Sri Muda.

“There is only one depot in Shah Alam, located in Section 17.”

She said a new depot located in Sungai Buloh was completed but was not utilised due to lack of manpower.

She is confident that once the Sungai Buloh depot is up and running, the problem of abandoned vehicles in Taman Sri Muda and other parts of Shah Alam would lessen.

In Kuala Lumpur, the Pudu morning market traders and businesss owners are frustrated that abandoned cars have hogged the back alley of the shoplots along Jalan Yew.

They said the cars that were parked in the alley were making it hard for them to load and unload goods.

Pudu Cheras Tiong Hua Hawkers and Traders Association chairman Kenny Ang said more than 20 shops were affected by the abandoned cars.

“The cars that are parked on both sides of the back alley block incoming traffic and business owners find it difficult to load and unload their goods.

“Some of these cars have expired road tax and flat tyres.

“Sometimes, foreigners will use these cars to store goods and sell them at the night market,” said Ang.

This abandoned car on the Federal Highway has been there for more than three months.

This abandoned car on the Federal Highway has been there for more than three months.

Hawker S.F. Hew, 50, said the abandoned cars were also taking up parking space meant for the public.

“There is a lack of parking space in the area and this is affecting our business.

“If there is no parking, customers will stop coming here to buy the things they need,” he said, adding that the abandoned cars had been there for more than a year.

A check at the site on Thursday found that there were six abandoned cars.

The site of the abandoned cars has also seemed to become a neon sign for people to dump rubbish.

Traders had also complained about rubbish and food waste being dumped at the alley between the abandoned cars and the morning market.

Kuala Lumpur and Selangor Petty Traders Association Federation Complaints Unit head Yong Wah said the market had existed for 60 years and for the past 30 years, the waste collection system had not been effective.

“There used to be several rubbish bins at the site but these bins were not replaced after they were damaged.

“Although there is a central rubbish bin in the middle of the market, it is not enough to cater for over 1,000 traders here.

“Some of the foreigners working here are dumping the food waste at the back lane.

“This is unhygienic and is attracting a lot of flies and other pests,” he said.

Cheras Wanita MCA chief Heng Sinn Yee said the abandoned cars and dumping of food waste at the back alley should be addressed immediately by the authorities.

“Pudu morning market is an old market and it is even promoted as one of the attractions on Trip Advisor.

“Such an awful sight at the market area will give tourists a bad impression of our country.

“We will highlight the matter to Kuala Lumpur City Hall and Alam Flora Sdn Bhd to put an end to the two problems,” she said.

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