Learn all about Polish Muslims


A mosque in Kruszyniany, Podlaskie voivodeship, Poland, in a photo taken at the end of the 19th century.

THE history and importance of the Muslim community in Poland takes centre stage in a new exhibition at the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia (IAMM).

 
Called “The Tatars – Muslims in the Republic of Poland”, the exhibition highlights the origin of the Tatars, which is one of the main ethno-religious groups in the country.

(From left) Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia collection head and exhibition manager Rekha Verma, Ukrainian ambassador to Malaysia Olexander Nechytaylo, Prof Ataullah and Polish ambassador to Malaysia Marcin Kubiak taking a tour of the exhibition.
(From left) Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia collection head and exhibition manager Rekha Verma, Ukrainian ambassador to Malaysia Olexander Nechytaylo, Prof Ataullah and Polish ambassador to Malaysia Marcin Kubiak taking a tour of the exhibition.

On until April 30, the exhibition features photographs, historical documents and accounts that chronicle the group from their early settlement during the 14th century up to the early 20th century.

Also on display are important archival images and documents shedding light on the Tatars as they went through the world wars.

A visitor looking at one of the many materials displayed at the exhibition.
A visitor looking at one of the many materials displayed at the exhibition

The event, which is a collaboration between IAMM and the Republic of Poland in Kuala Lumpur, is aimed at preserving the Muslim heritage and culture.

A photograph showing the Tatars‘ Muslim ceremony of name giving.
A photograph showing the Tatars‘ Muslim ceremony of name giving.

At the launch on Tuesday, a talk titled “Islam and Relationship with the Muslim lands in Poland” was given by European and Islamic civilisation expert and historian Prof Dr Ataullah Bogdan Kopanski.

Photo of a mosque in Slonim during the interwar period.
Photo of a mosque in Slonim during the interwar period

“Islam has been the religion of Polish Tatars for over 600 years.

“Living further from the main Muslim centres, they had built their own mosques and cemeteries, known as mizar, and also copied the Quran for their needs,” said Prof Ataullah.

Entrance fee is RM14 for adults, RM7 for students or individuals aged below 18 years old. Admission is free for children below six.

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