Satisfying kolo mee cravings


A small bowl of kolo mee is RM5 at the 7th Mile Kitchen. But patrons can enjoy 12 pieces of wantan with their noodles for another RM5.

A small bowl of kolo mee is RM5 at the 7th Mile Kitchen. But patrons can enjoy 12 pieces of wantan with their noodles for another RM5.

HAVING spent three years in Miri, Sarawak, I had the opportunity to try food not easily available in the Klang Valley. One such dish is kolo mee.

Not only is it a must-have when visiting the Land of the Hornbills, but it’s also affordable.

I recall paying RM2.50 back then for a bowl of kolo mee.

For those who have not heard of it or seen it, the dish looks similar to wantan mee; with different garnishing and noodles used.

The Kolo Mee at 7th Mile Kitchen is served with char siu minced pork, with its noodles drizzled generously with pork lard, and topped with spring onions and fried onions for more give it more flavour.

Kolo mee noodles are springier than wantan noodles and it does not come drenched in dark sauce.

When having kolo mee, I strongly believe that you need a Sarawakian to prepare it for you; only they know how to do it best.

So, while I had tried kolo mee in Shah Alam, I found another place I would gladly go back to for a simple bowl of kolo mee.

Hidden on the ground floor of Pangsapuri Kelana Sentral in Kelana Jaya is 7th Mile Kitchen, a restaurant run by a couple from Kuching.

The eatery serving Sarawak street food has been at its current location for four-and-a-half years.

Cook and owner Alex Kwan, 38 said they see a good number of people walking in for lunch but it’s on weekends that they have more Sarawakians, who are mostly regulars.

The eatery is a simple setup, with no fancy decorations.

1 A small bowl of kolo mee is RM5 at the 7th Mile Kitchen. But patrons can enjoy 12 pieces of wantan with their noodles for another RM5.2 Kwan blanches each bowl of noodle skilfully before garnishing it with minced meat and char siew and topping it off with pork lard, spring onion and fried onions.
Kwan blanches each bowl of noodle skilfully before garnishing it with minced meat and char siew and topping it off with pork lard, spring onion and fried onions.

On the walls, it is cheekily advertised that the food is “cat tested”, referring to the owners’ Kuching origins, and approved.

As we were about to order our food, my friends and I were told that they only had kolo mee left and we could pair this with kiau, which is dried wantan.

Paired our kolo mee, which was only RM5, with a bowl containing 12 pieces of kiau for RM5.

So we placed our order and later tucked into our small bowl of kolo mee, which was only RM5, and a bowl containing 12 pieces of kiau for RM5.

It was a simple lunch but packed with flavour.

I suggest drenching your noodles with a spoon of soup, which is served with every bowl, to easily untangle the noodles.

The noodles drizzled with pork lard was tasty and the dried wantan came with a generous filling of minced meat.

The kolo mee is topped with spring onion, char siew, minced pork and fried onion, giving the dish a sweet crunchiness.

Kwan also whips up tomato noodles for RM5.50 (small) and RM6 (big), and Sarawak laksa for RM6 (small) and RM6.50 (big).

They also have Sarawak dumpling at RM6 per piece.

The restaurant is open from 7am to 2.30pm (Tuesdays to Fridays) and from 7.30am to 2.30pm (weekends and public holidays).