A showcase of Chinese orchestral skills


  • Community
  • Thursday, 17 Dec 2015

ipamusic121215 6... Students playing the ruan during the Perak Chinese Orchestra Camp concert at the banquet hall in the state secretariat building on Dec 12.

AFTER a gruelling four days of honing their skills, more than 110 Chinese orchestra students could finally show off the fruits of the labour by performing in the inaugural Perak Chinese Orchestra Camp concert.

Under the guidance of eight local instructors and one from Singapore, the students aged 15 to 17, put on a mesmerising show in front of their families and guests.

The night saw to the musicians appearing on stage to perform with their instruments first, before finally coming together for a grand orchestral ensemble finale.

During the end of the first half of the concert, Singaporean instructor Teoh Choo Hwa, who specialises in the suona (double-reeded horn), even joined his students on stage.

Together with other suona players, they enchanted the audience playing two Chinese folk songs – Cai Cha Pu Die (Picking Tea, Fluttering Butterflies) and Su Wu Mu Yang (Warrior Shepherd from Suzhou).

Other players showed their skiills with their instruments like the yangqin, dizi, guzheng, and pipa, performing beautiful melodies.

ipamusic121215 1... Students playing in the grand orchestral ensemble finale at the end of the Perak Chinese Orchestra Camp concert in the banquet hall of the state secretariat building on Dec 12.
Students playing in the grand orchestral ensemble finale of the concert.

Present to show his support for the concert was state Non-Islamic Affairs Committee chairman Datuk Dr Mah Hang Soon, who congratulated the students for their successful completion of the camp and the concert.

“From the nation, down to the Chinese community, what we want are energetic youths who appreciate Chinese culture.

“Because of you, thousand years of Chinese history can be inherited by the younger generation,” he said in his speech before the concert started.

Dr Mah said Chinese orchestra, also known as Chinese folk music, is a treasure of Chinese cultural heritage.

Camp organiser-cum-conductor Ooi Wei Chern (third from left) handing over a souvenir to state Non-Islamic Affairs Committee chairman Datuk Dr Mah Hang Soon (third from right) during the Perak Chinese Orchestra Camp concert at the banquet hall in the state secretariat building on Dec 12.
Camp organiser-cum-conductor Ooi Wei Chern (third from left) handing over a souvenir to Dr Mah (fourth from left) during the concert.

“This music is born from the people and it grows with the people. It cannot be absent in our cultural activities.

“With more Chinese communities formed outside of China, it is great to see that Chinese orchestra has garnered a worldwide recognition.

“As Einstein once said, ‘a society with no music is a society with no soul,’ we must work hard to ensure the continuity of Chinese orchestra music in not only our younger generations, but our future ones as well,” he said.


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