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Retelling Chowrasta Market’s history


Fishy tale: Camp participants (from left) Nur Mashita Kamaruzaman, 14, Nur Eireena Zaidi, 15, and Nur Syifa Rozi, 16, showing their 3D installation during theclosing ceremony of Heritage Heboh: Youth Arts Camp at Chowrasta Market, George Town.

Fishy tale: Camp participants (from left) Nur Mashita Kamaruzaman, 14, Nur Eireena Zaidi, 15, and Nur Syifa Rozi, 16, showing their 3D installation during theclosing ceremony of Heritage Heboh: Youth Arts Camp at Chowrasta Market, George Town.

FOR five days, 40 students, aged between 14 and 17, learned all about the history of Chowrasta Market the fun way.

The Heritage Heboh: Youth Arts Camp, which is a joint project by Arts-Ed and George Town World Heritage Incorporated (GTWHI), saw students being tasked to map the place through site visits and document it using creative medias.

Arts-Ed honorary secretary Molly Lee said by the end of the camp the students had come out with seven montages and four 3D installations.

SMK Air Itam student Muhd Nur Haziq Yusir, 17, said his first visit to the market was enlightening.

“One of the notable differences between this market and the rest is that we can find various Penang specialties here such as jeruk.

“I also learned how to haggle for some of the goods,” he said in jest at the market recently.

GTWHI general manager Lim Chooi Ping said Chowrasta Market was selected because it is one of the oldest local markets since the 1890s.

“This is an initiative to involve the young in protecting and safeguarding Penang’s heritage sites,” she said.

Lim added that the committee was now reviewing the inventory list for George Town World Heritage Sites until the end of the year.

“We are identifying the buildings to make the listing more comprehensive and to ensure that none of the buildings that need to be preserved are left out.

“We are still waiting for feedback from the stakeholders,” she added.

Lim noted that according to the George Town Urban Market Survey Final Report 2012, the term ‘Chowrasta’ was a direct translation from Urdu language as most Indian traders sold their fish and poultry here.

   

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