Unkempt swimming pools are dengue hazards


SWIMMING pools, which were once symbols of luxurious homes, have now become a potential dengue threat for Bukit Bandaraya folk.

StarMetro recently checked on the newly built exclusive bungalows in Jalan Medang Tanduk and found the units equipped with empty swimming pools filled with stagnant water, collected from rainy days.

Jalan Medang Tanduk resident of 34 years Tan Sri Ahmad Khair, 74, said the he worries about the swimming pools becoming a dengue threat to his family

Following a suspected dengue scare, resident of 34 years, Datuk Ahmad Khair (pic), 74, who fears for his family, said Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) should not wait for the dengue statistics to increase before taking action.

“These pools are becoming major mosquito breeding grounds.

“What is the point of DBKL asking us to clear our flower pots and prevent water containment in our drains when there are huge catchments like this?” he asked.

Nearby Ahmad’s home is a swimming pool left abandoned after the bungalow was torn down.

While the lot had been sealed off, StarMetro found the pool still filled with water and untouched.

Following a recent dengue inspection on these sites by the Health Ministry, health officer Muhammad Azhar Jamil and his team had taken steps to eradicate the mosquito larvae in the pools.

“We are spraying Abate 500 E liquid which kills the breeding spot within three minutes.

“The Abate 1.1G granules that we place can last up to three months, preventing Aedes mosquitoes from breeding in this area.

“We will send a report with addresses of each vacant swimming pool to DBKL to follow up on this case,” he said.

Resident for 25 years Tan Sri Ramon Navaratnam, 80, said he was sceptical about the effectiveness of the insecticide used to kill the mosquitoes.

“Authorities are failing in the fight against dengue.

Risky: Residents are worried that stagnant water trapped in the newly built bungalows on their street could harbour mosquito larva.
Risky: Residents are worried that stagnant water trapped in the newly built bungalows on their street could harbour mosquito larva.

“They need to go to the source of the problem, by pumping out water from these pools or filling them up with sand.

“Fines and penalties have been woefully inadequate. It does not reflect the severity of the issue at all.

“If the authorities cannot fight mosquitoes, they can’t fight other problems,” said Navaratnam.

Residents’ Association president Datuk A. Ali said the swimming pools of both unfinished and abandoned projects have to be, at the very least, maintained by its respective owners.

“I have personally tried to contact the owners of these abandoned bungalows but none of them have been responsive.

“I have also been waiting for the health officer to follow up with us and take further action on the abandoned pools but I have still not received any feedback or seen any action taken,” he said yesterday.

Up and coming: One of the bungalows under construction in Jalan  Medang Serai.
Up and coming: One of the bungalows under construction in Jalan Medang Serai.

Kuala Lumpur mayor Datuk Ahmad Phesal Talib said DBKL would step in if the owners and developers did not take responsibility.

“Developers and houseowners are supposed to fill up these empty pools with sand to make sure it does not become a dengue hazard.

“If the owners and developers do not act quickly, DBKL will step in and stern action will be taken against them,” he said.

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