SIA flies world’s longest commercial flight to New York


  • Travel
  • Wednesday, 03 Oct 2018

Singapore Airlines will launch on Oct 11 the world’s longest commercial flights, with non-stop services between Singapore and New York using the new Airbus A350-900ULR. The ultra-long range aircraft will offer passengers a more comfortable travelling experience. — Singapore Airlines

The fastest way to travel between Singapore and New York is through non-stop flights. And that’s just what Singapore Airlines (SIA) is offering – a seamless connection between both cities, when it launches the world’s longest commercial flights on Oct 11.

The 16,700km route to Newark Liberty International Airport will take up to 18 hours 45 minutes, and will be served by the new ultra-long range Airbus A350-900ULR.

SIA Chief Executive Officer Goh Choon Phong said the airline aims to provide the best possible travel experience for passengers using the latest technology.

“The flights will offer our customers the fastest way to travel between the two cities – in great comfort, together with Singapore Airlines’ legendary service – and will help boost connectivity to and through the Singapore hub,” he said.

The route will initially be served three times a week, departing Singapore on Monday, Thursday and Saturday. Daily operations will commence from Oct 18 after an additional aircraft enters service.

Passengers can look forward to a more pleasant travelling experience on board the A350-900ULR. Features such as higher ceilings, larger windows, an extra wide body and lighting designed to reduce jetlag make for a more comfortable journey.

Its carbon composite airframe also allows for improved air quality due to a more optimised cabin altitude and humidity levels. The aircraft will be configured in a two-class layout: 67 Business Class seats and 94 Premium Economy Class seats.

SIA is the world’s first customer for the new A350-900ULR, with seven on firm order with Airbus.

The new aircraft will also be used when SIA launches non-stop flights between Singapore and Los Angeles on Nov 2.

The route will initially be served three times per week, departing Singapore on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. Daily operations will commence from Nov 9. Additional three services per week will be added from Dec 7, lifting total non-stop flights between Singapore and LA to 10 times per week.

In addition, the carrier will increase its daily non-stop Singapore-San Francisco services from seven to 10 times per week. The three additional services starts Nov 28 onwards and will depart every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday.

Along with the non-stop Singapore-New York services, SIA will link Singapore and the US with 27 weekly non-stop flights by the end of the year.

“Our US services have always been popular with our customers and we are pleased to be able to provide even more travel options. SIA will redefine the convenience of travelling between Singapore and the United States, delivering on our promise to constantly enhance the travel experience of our customers,” Goh said.

Together with SIA’s current daily one stop service to LA via Tokyo, the City of Angels will be served 17 times per week.

The new Singapore-LA service heralds the end of SIA’s existing one-stop service to LA via Seoul after Nov 30 this year.

SIA currently operates 40 flights per week to the US cities of Houston, New York, LA and San Francisco. With the new flights, total US frequency will increase to 53 per week by December.

Singapore Airlines is offering Premium Economy Class all-in return fare deals starting from RM4,058 for Los Angeles and San Francisco, and RM4,258 for New York. Travel periods start from Oct 15 for New York, Nov 2 for Los Angeles and Nov 28 for San Francisco, and all to end on March 31 next year. The all-in return fares are available for departures from Malaysia. Terms and conditions apply. For more information, visit www.singaporeair.com.


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