New museum exhibition celebrates legendary couturier Christian Dior


By AGENCY
  • Style
  • Sunday, 30 May 2021

The exhibition will look at the importance of the rose, or roses, in the life and career of the great French couturier. Photo: AFP

Dior And Roses is a tribute to the "queen of flowers", which so marked the childhood and the life of the great French couturier, inspiring much of his work and that of his successors, in the realms of both fashion and fragrance.

The exhibition will be on display at the Christian Dior museum, in Granville, France, when it reopens its doors on June 5.

More than a simple flower, the rose is testimony to the passion for gardening that the couturier discovered in his childhood home of Les Rhumbs Villa in Granville.

It is also the colour of this family home,"plastered in a very soft pink", as the great couturier himself said, a colour with infinite variations, as well as one of his favourite flowers, source of inspiration for one of the most emblematic silhouettes in the history of fashion, that of the flower-woman.

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While the exhibition Dior And Roses pays tribute to the queen of flowers, it also looks at this flower as an influence. It is the legacy left by roses that will be celebrated over three levels within the villa Les Rhumbs in Granville, from June 5 to Oct 31,2021.

The exhibition, which will of course focus on Dior couture, accessories and perfumes, but also on art, looks at the importance of the rose, or roses, in the life and career of the great French couturier, and his successors, from Yves Saint Laurent to Maria Grazia Chiuri via Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferre, John Galliano, and Raf Simons.

Among the pieces presented are the Antibes ensemble, signed Christian Dior, from the Spring/Summer 1955 haute couture collection, entirely covered in roses, as well as the Manuela dress in coral silk faille adorned with a rose at the waist, signed Christian Dior by Yves Saint Laurent, from the Spring/Summer 1959 haute couture collection.

There is also a sumptuous embroidered tulle dress, signed Christian Dior by Maria Grazia Chiuri, from the Spring/Summer 2020 ready-to-wear collection.

On the accessories side, visitors will appreciate the Bal De Mai necklace designed by Victoire De Castellane for Dior Haute Joaillerie in 2011, as well as a Lady Dior handbag, signed by Christian Dior by John Galliano, dating from the year 2000.

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The exhibition will also highlight a selection of perfumes, including an exceptional edition of Miss Dior, Christian Dior's first perfume created in 1947, in which the rose is an integral part of the composition.

Artworks and objects, as well as a series of portraits will complete the exhibition. A tribute will also be paid to the great French couturier's younger sister, Catherine Dior, his muse and confidante, who also developed a passion for flowers over time to the point of making it her profession. – AFP Relaxnews

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