Locust genome makes pest more vulnerable


  • Living
  • Tuesday, 21 Jan 2014

CHINESE scientists said last week they had unravelled the genetic code of the locust, laying bare “hundreds” of genes that can be targeted by insecticides.

The genetic code of Locusta migratoria is remarkably big – at 6.5 gigabytes, it is the largest animal genome sequenced so far, they reported in the journal Nature Communications.

Large clusters of the insect’s genes are associated with long-distance flight, eating plants and metabolising food, they said. But there are also many repeated, mobile sections of DNA, called transposable elements, that were never weeded out by evolution and remain in the genome, the scientists said.

An ancient peril that can eat its own body weight in food in a single day, the locust is capable of inflicting famine and wiping out livelihoods when it swarms.

In one of the biggest documented events, billions of locusts swarmed across 29 million sq km of land in 60 countries in 1988, even crossing the Atlantic from Africa to the Caribbean.

The genome code is a draft, but once it has been polished, could serve a blueprint for scientists seeking new ways of attacking the voracious insect.

It throws up “hundreds of potential insecticide target genes” according to the probe, headed by Le Kang of the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing.

Finding a smart, environmentally friendly way to kill the pest is a major goal, the authors noted. Previous work into locusts has found a biochemical mechanism that prompts the creatures to swarm.

Locusts are usually solitary, but are stimulated into gathering and searching for food en masse by jostling, which triggers serotonin, a pleasure chemical in the brain. Once in swarm mode, locusts change colour from green to bright yellow, gaining large muscles that equip them for prolonged flight. – AFP

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
Join our Telegram channel to get our Evening Alerts and breaking news highlights
   

Next In Living

The planet's heating up and it's affecting our health now
Malaysia's latest plans to fight global warming Premium
The climate crisis is causing mental health issues Premium
Once green, prehistoric Arabia drew early humans from Africa
Study documents dramatic loss of remaining Pyrenees glaciers
Dear Thelma: My son only wants to play online games all day long
Donkey milk soap soaking up fans in Jordan
World's largest plant capturing CO2 from air starts up in Iceland
Scotland's latest tourist attraction is a whisky wonderland
7 hunting dogs that make good house pets

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers