Surviving the age of selfies: Japan's purikura photo booths cling on


By AGENCY

A pair of Japanese schoolgirls primp their hair before a long mirror, preparing for the perfect shot. But they are not taking a smartphone selfie, they are using a "purikura" photo booth.

Old-style photo booths have staged something of a comeback in parts of the world in recent years, for their nostalgic value in the smartphone era. But the purikura - an abbreviation of the Japanese pronunciation of "print club" - offers much more than a simple strip of passport photos.

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 53
Cxense type: NA
User access status: 3
Subscribe now to our Premium Plan for an ad-free and unlimited reading experience!

Purikura , photography , Japan , culture , photo booth , selfie

   

Next In Culture

Malaysian literary pioneer Wong Phui Nam has died aged 87
Writing as Robert Galbraith, JK Rowling has spun out an epic mystery
NFTs and burning paintings at new Damien Hirst exhibition
Gustav Klimt: 'Gold In Motion' immersive exhibit dazzles in New York
This bookish Balkans hamlet is a 'village of enlightenment'
Bargain hunter scores 700-year-old medieval times document
New book shows personal side of 'Mockingbird' author Harper Lee
V&A celebrates 'Korean Wave' of popular culture with new exhibition
There is no collecting art without social media anymore, says art influencer
'Nosferatu 100': vampire exhibit welcomes your blood donation

Others Also Read