World’s best buildings announced at awards


  • Design
  • Monday, 09 Nov 2015

The Hotel Hotel in Canberra, Australia was named World Interior of the Year. Photo: March Studio

If the odds were “stacked” against it, The Interlace residential development certainly rose above them to win the coveted World Building of the Year title at the recent World Architecture Festival 2015 Awards.

The vertical village in Singapore, designed by OMA/Ole Scheeren, defies conventional typology and is characterised by six-storey, horizontally-stacked apartment blocks arranged in hexagonal grids around oversized courtyards.

The result is a balanced network of living and social spaces that blend into the city-state’s Southern Ridges green belt. The Interlace, a category winner under Housing, beat 16 other contenders to receive this award.

The Interlace in Singapore won the coveted World Building of the Year title at the recent World Architecture Festival 2015 Awards. Photo: OMA
The Interlace in Singapore won the coveted World Building of the Year title at the recent World Architecture Festival 2015 Awards. Photo: OMA

Meanwhile, a challenging site did not stop the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) from designing a high-end residential tower project in Canada that took home the Future Project of the Year prize.

The Vancouver House sits on a narrow strip of land trisected by an overhead bridge. Working around the limited space, the tower starts from a small triangular base that “twists” up into a wider form above, resulting in a facade that resembles a curtain being drawn apart.

Impressing judges by being an exemplary resilient, ecological solution to mitigate large-scale floods is the Yanweizhou Park in Jinhua city, Zhejiang province, China.

Winning the Landscape of the Year award, this Turenscape International project is located at the mouth of three rivers and employs a new strategy to create a water-resilient terraced river embankment grown with flood-adapted native vegetation.

The Small Project of the Year title went to a Swedish football stadium in miniature done by DinellJohansson. Lidingovallen incorporates a stand, office space and cafe all in one structure and stood out among the other nominees for the huge impact it creates.

The Vancouver House residential tower in Canada took home the Future Project of the Year award. Photo: Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)
The Vancouver House residential tower in Canada took home the Future Project of the Year award. Photo: Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Meanwhile, employing the concept of fragmentation and creative use of timber landed the Hotel Hotel in Canberra, Australia the World Interior of the Year award. A work of March Studio, the hotel’s “splintered” lobby entrance marks the property’s unique design feature. A network of timber pieces lines the walls and furniture to form a tunnel that leads guests from the reception to the other parts of the hotel. Another highlight of the design is a grand staircase in the centre that anchors the end of the hotel entrance.

The world’s best interior was chosen from among nine categories that included Hotels, Bars and Restaurants, Residential and Retail.

The World Architecture Festival (WAF) and the INSIDE World Festival of Interiors 2015 were held in Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands from Nov 4 to 6.

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Across The Star Online