New legal website set up by six Malaysians offers info that's easily digestible


LawQuacks highlights articles revolving around the law and various legal issues, from homelessness, remand hearings to pupillage.

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Can Covid-19 vaccinations be made mandatory by the government? The answer is yes.

To find out exactly how, you can visit lawquacks.com (under Easy Reading), a website set up by a group of six friends who met while doing their pupillage at a local law firm together.

Referring to themselves informally as “The Quacks”, Arif Faiz, Ananda Mohan, Cheam Tat Sean, Chua Yi Xin, Faith Chan and Javed Khan – aged between 24 and 27 – first bonded over a mutual love for crosswords (the New York Times daily mini is a favourite), curry puffs and conversations.

The idea for the website was developed in May last year, during the first conditional movement control order in Malaysia. At that time, they regularly spent time together virtually via Microsoft Teams.When Ananda began sharing articles he had written with the group, the idea for the website was born.When Ananda began sharing articles he had written with the group, the idea for the website was born.

When Ananda began sharing articles he had written with the group – with the aim of getting their feedback on his writing skill and his approach towards understanding and discussing the law – the idea for the website was born.

“He believed, as do we, that law should be accessible to all and in an easy and fun way. We all really enjoyed reading his articles, which were often whimsical, and always informative, much like his personality.Among the most well-read articles have been those in The Pupillage Papers series.Among the most well-read articles have been those in The Pupillage Papers series.

“It felt like a waste to keep the articles and ideas to ourselves, so we decided to make a website where we could publish articles which are not only informative, but also reflect our respective personalities and interests, ” says the group in a recent interview.

Today, the online portal highlights articles revolving around the law and various legal issues, from homelessness, remand hearings to pupillage. Divided into three different categories of articles – namely, Easy Reading, Peer Tips and Deep Dive – the website went live last year.Chua (pix) and Arif (below) are focused more on content production.Chua (pix) and Arif (below) are focused more on content production.

Easy Reading is mostly geared towards light topics for straightforward consumption. Peer Tips focuses on advice and tips for young professional legal entrants, while Deep Dive provides a more in-depth look into a particular legal topic that the author finds interesting.

The main aim of the group is to share their understanding and knowledge of the law with the public, as well as provide a different perspective on various topics.

“There are scores of legal websites available on the Internet, all of which publish articles that comment and report on legal developments.

“However, what we provide are articles which try to minimise legal jargon and which focus on topics that would pique people’s interests and/or be directly relevant to them. With this, we hope to make legal topics more accessible to the general population.

“LawQuacks is not just about setting out the law for you – it allows views and expressions on the law, and comments and thoughts on how things are and maybe how things should be.

“Besides, we can never run out of laws to talk about, learn about and argue about. We can’t stop quacking about it and we would love to hear differing opinions on issues discussed and open a dialogue, ” they say.

At the moment, Ananda, Arif, Chua and Javed are focused more on content production, while Cheam and Chan handle the editing and administrative work, such as managing the site and social media.Khan is also involved in content production.Khan is also involved in content production.

For the most part, they try to keep with the times by writing on current and contemporary topics while keeping to a regular publishing schedule. They are still learning the ropes and confess that they often struggle with figuring out the technical aspects of keeping the website up and running, as they manage it all by themselves.

Their biggest challenge? Juggling the site and their full-time jobs.

“Work can be pretty demanding, but we try to adhere to the publishing schedule we have set for the site.

“We may not be strictly on time, all the time, as life happens and work schedules can be unpredictable, especially being the most junior in our respective firms! That said, writing articles in our free time lets us engage with the law based on what we find interesting and on what we think might interest our readers.Cheam (pix) and Chan (below) handle the editing and administrative work in the team.Cheam (pix) and Chan (below) handle the editing and administrative work in the team.

“For some, legal practice does not always provide the freedom to learn and work with different areas of law, particularly for those who specialise. So it is definitely rewarding to have an outlet that allows us to broaden our knowledge of different areas of law and hopefully write interesting material for others to enjoy, ” the group shares.

Among their most well-read articles have been those in “The Pupillage Papers” series, which serves as a guide for pupils on the numerous papers to be filed in court in order to be admitted as an advocate and solicitor of the Malaysian Bar.

In the long run, “The Quacks” hope that this project will reach more people over time, and become more established as a legal website.

“We do see the potential to collaborate with other like-minded content creators and think it would be great to be able to support each other’s efforts. Nowadays, there are many young professionals who are taking their own initiatives and producing informative content, both in the legal sphere and in other industries.

“LawQuacks is just one example of that. We don’t hope to be authorities on anything, but we hope each reader leaves having learnt something. The dream, in short, would be a populace of youths more interested in law, ” they conclude.

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