Singapore to launch standards for renewable energy certificates


SINGAPORE: Singapore plans to launch standardised guidelines for renewable energy (RE) certificates, part of efforts to decarbonise its power sector and develop a regional grid, a minister said yesterday.

The certificates, called RECs, are market-based instruments substantiating that electricity has been generated from RE sources.

One certificate represents that one megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from a RE source and delivered to the grid.

“These guidelines will help support RE deployment in Singapore and in the region, supporting the development of a regional grid that taps different types of low carbon energy sources in the region,” Tan See Leng, the minister for manpower and second minister for trade and industry said at the Asian Clean Energy Summit.

Tan said the guidelines were the first of their kind in South-East Asia and define the types of RE sources – such as solar, wind and biomass – that are eligible to generate RECs.

“The growth of a regional grid presents opportunities across the RE value chain, and can leverage our current RE ecosystem,” said Tan. — Reuters

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