Baby steps to self-sufficiency


DLMI managing director Tarang Gupta said the partnership would allow local dairy farmers in the DLMI’s Dairy Development Programme (DDP) to enhance the quality and volume of cattle raw milk in Malaysia.

KUALA LUMPUR: Dutch Lady Milk Industries Bhd (DLMI) is facilitating a 100% self-sufficiency level for Malaysia’s fresh milk production which will lessen the country’s dependency on imported fresh milk.

The company has inked a memorandum of collaboration with the Department of Veterinary Services Malaysia (DVS) for a collaboration to achieve sustainable dairy cattle farming.

In a statement, DLMI managing director Tarang Gupta said the partnership would allow local dairy farmers in the DLMI’s Dairy Development Programme (DDP) to enhance the quality and volume of cattle raw milk in Malaysia.

“With our 58-year presence in Malaysia, we are well-positioned to be the conduit between Malaysia and the Netherlands to facilitate knowledge transfer to create a successful, sustainable dairy sector in the country.

“As the largest purchaser of local fresh milk from DVS milk collection centres in Malaysia, DLMI is committed to helping local dairy smallholders to increase their yield and milk quality, including making dairy farming a steady and growing income source for our vendors, ” he said.

The ideal platform to achieve the goal of self-sufficient fresh milk supply is through the DDP and the Farmer2Farmer (F2F) programme, said Tarang.

The F2F programme emphasises on hygiene management and learning the essential elements in ensuring quality milk as well as increasing the volume of raw milk.

According to DVS, Malaysia’s self-sufficiency level in milk production stands at 62%.

The National Dairy Industry Development Programme aims for Malaysia to have 100% self-sufficiency level for local fresh milk production by 2025.

Tarang explained that the initiative would involve the exchange and sharing of resources, facilities, data, knowledge and skills to ensure commercial and strategic advantages are in the best interest of local dairy farmers.

“DLMI is grateful for the opportunity to work with DVS, Minister of Agriculture and Food Industries and the embassy of the Netherlands over the years – to help identify the farmers from both countries who could benefit from this cooperation, as well as to facilitate the processes to make it work, ” he said. Meanwhile, DVS director-general Datuk Dr Norlizan Mohd Noor said the collaboration was a unique opportunity for Malaysian farmers to be exposed to the best practices by Dutch farmers, whose dairy farming tradition dated back 150 years.

“This also opens up the opportunity to boost agropreneurship amongst Malaysians, particularly youths, ” he added.

In line with the government’s target for the country to be self-sufficient on milk production, Norlizan noted that the F2F programme would also help DVS’s efforts in the prevention and control of zoonotic diseases and boost food production from animal-based products.

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