Tesla fires up Wall Street’s US$300bil custom-index boom


“The Tesla issue of the last few months is probably highlighting for the first time to a lot of people that the S&P is not the largest 500 companies, ” said Elya Schwartzman, founder of ES Investment Consulting LLC. With direct indexing, “you can just create your own index and say, look I want the largest 600 companies by US market capitalisation, ” he added.

NEW YORK: When the world’s most-famous electric car maker finally joins the S&P 500, it will be bitter-sweet for investors with about US$11 trillion in funds tied to the gauge. Their benchmark-hugging bets get some Elon Musk magic at last, but they pay seven-times last year’s price for the privilege.

Given the chance, how many would have added Tesla Inc to their index exposure in January? Or even June, when the shares had merely doubled?

Customisation is at the heart of a red-hot investing strategy driving two of the biggest deals in asset management this year. Known as direct indexing, it blurs the line between stock-picking and benchmark-following and now commands about US$300bil after its popularity surged in recent years.

The idea is simple: Instead of buying shares in a fund that slavishly holds all the companies in an index, investors buy those stocks directly. The index exposure is broadly the same, but the investors are no longer wedded to it. They can make tweaks – like adding a skyrocketing automaker well ahead of the S&P 500, for example.

“The Tesla issue of the last few months is probably highlighting for the first time to a lot of people that the S&P is not the largest 500 companies, ” said Elya Schwartzman, founder of ES Investment Consulting LLC.

With direct indexing, “you can just create your own index and say, look I want the largest 600 companies by US market capitalisation, ” he added.

Direct indexing is a modern twist on separately managed accounts, which have been around for years and are used to build bespoke portfolios for wealthy individuals.

The age of zero-commission trading and growing use of fractional shares means similar strategies can now be deployed for smaller investors.

It remains a nascent part of the asset-management industry, but the buzz is building. Morgan Stanley’s US$7bil purchase of Eaton Vance Corp is all about direct indexing – the latter’s Parametric Portfolio Associates is the largest provider in the field. BlackRock Inc this week announced a US$1bil takeover of Aperio, a creator of tailored index strategies.

The ESG effect

As dramatic as the Tesla example is, the real selling point for direct indexing may turn out to be the ability to remove companies from a portfolio’s exposure rather than add them.

In the drive toward investments that meet environmental, social and governance criteria – which also happens to be one of the tailwinds for tesla – huge disagreements exist over exactly what qualifies. Direct indexing allows an investor to make adjustments according to his or her own views, and remove companies not up to scratch.

“Having this additional need for customisation is really where we get involved, ” said Jeff Brown, director of institutional portfolio management for Parametric.

“If I want market exposure, there are quick easy ways to get it through an ETF, but if I want to customise in any way, shape or form that doesn’t exist in the ETF space, that’s where we can step in to fill that gap.”

That kind of flexibility comes with a price, however.

While fierce competition among brokers and asset managers has driven down trading costs across the industry – boosting direct-indexing products in the process – they still typically charge about 0.15%-0.35%.

That’s less than an active mutual fund, but three to five times the price of some equity exchange-traded funds. The fee for the Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF (VTI) is just 0.03%, for example.

“If direct indexing is going to experience another leg of growth, it’s going have to fan out further to the mass affluent market, ” said Ben Johnson, Morningstar’s global director of ETF research.

“It’s going to have to be achievable at a lower entry point.”

Until recently, direct indexing tended to be the preserve of high net-worth individuals, according to Tom O’Shea, director of managed accounts at Cerulli Associates.

Tax benefit

The investing approach offers a huge tax benefit because investors have more losses which they can use to offset gains. ETFs famously do this as well, but direct indexing lets an investor utilise it at an individual stock level, which is estimated to add between 1 and 2 percentage points a year to returns.

Making the most of that traditionally required a large number of securities owned outright, putting it out of reach of the average investor. But improving technology and fractional shares offered by brokerages like Charles Schwab Corp. and Robinhood are changing things.

“You’re able to do the same thing with a smaller portfolio, ” said O’Shea. “You can have 200 securities, but you don’t have to have as much money.” — Bloomberg

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Wall Street , S&P 500 , Tesla , electric car , index , boom ,

   

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