Boeing 737 MAX devt marred by design, communications flaws


  • Aviation
  • Wednesday, 01 Jul 2020

The 52-page report by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General, dated June 29 and set to be made public Wednesday, laid bare mistakes made by both the planemaker and FAA in the development and certification of Boeing's top-selling aircraft. (Picture shows A Boeing 737 MAX airplane lands after a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, U.S. June 29, 2020. - Reuters)

WASHINGTON/SEATTLE/CHICAGO: Boeing Co failed to submit certification documents to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) detailing changes to a key flight control system faulted in two fatal crashes, a long-awaited government report seen by Reutershas found.

The flight control system, known as MCAS, was "not an area of emphasis" because Boeing presented it to the FAA as a modification of the jet's existing speed trim system, with limited range and use, according to the report.

The 52-page report by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General, dated June 29 and set to be made public Wednesday, laid bare mistakes made by both the planemaker and FAA in the development and certification of Boeing's top-selling aircraft.

It is the latest of reports faulting the plane's approval, while the Justice Department has an ongoing criminal investigation.

In January, Boeing released hundreds of internal messages that contained harshly critical comments about the development of the 737 MAX, including one that said the plane was "designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys."

The 737 MAX has been grounded from commercial flight worldwide since March 2019 after two crashes killed 346 people in Ethiopia and Indonesia over a five-month span.

Boeing's so-called MCAS stall-prevention system has been faulted in both crashes, when the system repeatedly and forcefully pushed down the jet's nose as pilots struggled to intervene. Crash investigators have pinpointed a cocktail of other factors.

The inspector general report details activities from the beginning of certification in January 2012 through the second crash and details allegations of "undue pressure" on Boeing employees. The IG's office will issue recommendations to the FAA later this year, the Transportation Department said in comments about the draft report submitted on June 8. - Reuters

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
Join our Telegram channel to get our Evening Alerts and breaking news highlights

   

Next In Business News

Powell says Fed likely to taper asset purchases 'at the same time'
Houston man pleads guilty in scheme to sell US$317 mln bogus masks to Australian state
Fed establishes standing repo facilities to support money markets
Oil settles up near $75; sharp U.S. inventory drop counters virus worry
GLOBAL MARKETS-US dollar, stocks dip as Fed keeps taper timing close to chest
Trading bounce for Bursa Malaysia
Credit Suisse’s Archegos inquiry rips bank’s due diligence
Double-digit growth in exports to major markets
Gadang posts quarterly net profit of RM3.7mil
Malaysia’s economic fundamentals still strong

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers