US stocks end strong month with bout of selling


  • Business
  • Tuesday, 01 Sep 2009

NEW YORK: After giving the stock market solid gains during August, investors still worried about the U.S. economy backtracked a bit during the final day of the month.

Stocks fell in light trading Monday after a plunge in China's main stock market sent a wave of selling around the world and added to concerns that stocks have rocketed too high, too fast.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index, which is the basis for many mutual funds, ended August higher to post its sixth straight monthly gain.

It is up 50.9 percent since early March, the best run since 1938.

The milestone brought little comfort to investors who are more concerned with the uncertainties of the future.

A 6.7 percent drop in China's main stock index rattled traders who were already on edge that they will have to slog through a tougher market in the fall.

September has been the worst month for the stock market over the past 80 years, and it begins with many analysts already worried that investors have bet too soon on a recovery.

Data due Tuesday on manufacturing and employment on Friday could upend the market's six-month-old rally or help push it forward.

The drop in U.S. stocks Monday was broad and a 48-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average was the biggest in two weeks.

Energy and materials stocks fell the most as prices for commodities like crude and copper plummeted.

The retreat shaved some gains from the best August since 2000.

For the month, the Dow rose 3.5 percent, the S&P 500 index added 3.4 percent and the Nasdaq rose 1.5 percent.

Since tumbling to a 12-year low in March, the Dow is up 45.1 percent since March and the Nasdaq is up 58.4 percent.

"The markets have been looking like they've been somewhat reluctant to hold their gains over the last couple of sessions," said Blaze Tankersley, chief market strategist at Bay Crest Partners, adding that the news out of China provided investors with a good excuse to sell.

The Dow fell 47.92, or 0.5 percent, to 9,496.38. The S&P 500 index fell 8.31, or 0.8 percent, to 1,020.62, while the Nasdaq fell 19.71, or 1 percent, to 2,009.06. Three stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to a light 1.4 million shares, compared with 1.2 billion Friday. Light volume can skew price moves. It is typically light in late summer as some traders take vacations. Japan's Nikkei stock average fell 0.4 percent after the country's opposition party came to power in a landslide victory. Germany's DAX index fell 0.9 percent, while France's CAC-40 lost 1.1 percent. The London Stock Exchange was closed for a holiday. Oil prices tumbled $2.78 to settle at $69.96 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

The S&P 500 index fell 8.31, or 0.8 percent, to 1,020.62, while the Nasdaq fell 19.71, or 1 percent, to 2,009.06.

Three stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to a light 1.4 million shares, compared with 1.2 billion Friday.

Light volume can skew price moves. It is typically light in late summer as some traders take vacations.

Japan's Nikkei stock average fell 0.4 percent after the country's opposition party came to power in a landslide victory.

Germany's DAX index fell 0.9 percent, while France's CAC-40 lost 1.1 percent.

The London Stock Exchange was closed for a holiday.

The price of copper fell 4.2 percent. Gold also fell as the dollar moved higher against other major currencies.

Demand for the safety of government debt rose, underscoring the market's uneasiness.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, fell to 3.41 percent from 3.45 percent late Friday.

Two big acquisitions totaling close to $10 billion did little to excite investors.

The Walt Disney Co. said it plans to buy Marvel Entertainment Inc. for $4 billion in cash and stock, while oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. said it will buy BJ Services Co. in a cash-and-stock deal valued at $5.5 billion.

Investors also looked past a report showing an improvement in Midwest business conditions.

The Chicago Purchasing Managers index, which measures business activity in Illinois, Michigan and Indiana, jumped to 50.0 in August from 43.4 in July, ending 10 consecutive months of drops.

The index is considered a precursor to the Institute for Supply Management's manufacturing index, which is due Tuesday.

A reading above 50 indicates growth in manufacturing, something that hasn't happened since January 2008.

Trading is expected to be light this week but there are still several important reports on the economy that could sway the market one way or the other.

The most closely watched data will come from the government's monthly jobs report on Friday. Economists are expecting another 220,000 jobs were lost, down from 247,000 in July.

Last month's report showed an unexpected dip in the unemployment rate and investors are anxious to see whether the rate continues to fall.

If fewer jobs are being lost, consumers might start to feel comfortable spending again and help get the economy back on its feet.

Analyst reports on Monday perhaps fanned investors' jitters about September, bringing reminders that the month often brings trouble for stocks.

It was nearly a year ago that the market slide turned into a plunge with the mid-September collapse of Lehman Brothers and the freeze in credit markets that made the recession tighten.

Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist, U.S. equity research at Standard & Poor's, noted that since 1929 the S&P 500 index has lost an average 1.3 percent for the month.

But in the 14 Septembers that followed the end of down markets, the index has gained about 2 percent.

In other trading, the Russell 2000 index of smaller companies fell 7.79, or 1.3 percent, to 572.07. - AP

European shares fall as China plunges nearly 7%

LONDON: European shares fell Monday after Chinese stocks plunged nearly 7 percent and Japanese shares weakened after that nation's opposition party came to power in a landslide victory.

Germany's DAX 30 blue-chip index fell 0.7 percent to 5,476.87, while France's CAC-40 was down 0.6 percent at 3670.43.

The London Stock Exchange was closed for a public holiday, and end-of-August trading volumes were light, which can enhance volatility.

Futures indicated a lower open on Wall Street as well, with Dow industrials futures 65 points lower at 9,471 and the broader Standard & Poor's 500 index futures down 5.9 points at 1021.50.

Dips in Chinese shares have sent ripples throughout markets in Europe and the United States, since China has continued to grow during the world recession.

Questions about China's ability to sustain stimulus-fed growth rates have fueled fears that any global economic recovery may not last.

In Shanghai, the main index plummeted 6.7 percent to 2,697.70, adding to a nearly 3 percent decline on Friday.

Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 1.9 percent.

Tokyo's Nikkei 225 stock average lost 41.61 points, or 0.4 percent, to 10,492.53 after jumping over 200 points earlier in the day.

Renewed selling in mainland Chinese shares reflected the growing unease among investors about government measures to restrict the lavish bank lending that has helped send markets surging this year.

Oliver Roth of Close Brothers Seydler Bank AG in Frankfurt said investors were concerned about possible trouble in China after huge amounts of government stimulus.

"The difference between the rest of the world and China is that in China, the huge money amounts that are coming from the central bank are already in the economy, so there is a bubble of a huge amount of liquidity in the real economy and the stock market," Roth said.

"And people are afraid of a blowing up of the bubble."

Additionally, political uncertainties weighed on German stocks after weekend election setbacks for Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, ahead of Sept. 27 national election, he said.

In Japan, investors tread cautiously after the Democratic Party of Japan swept to power in national elections over the weekend amid frustrations with the ruling party as the world's second-economy emerges from its worst downturn in decades.

After spiking in the morning, stocks fell as initial enthusiasm over the opposition's victory quickly gave way to concerns about its economic policies and the surging yen, which hurts exports.

The Democrats are largely untested and there are worries their programs would increase Japan's already ballooning debt, analysts said.

Elsewhere, Korea's Kospi was down 1.1 percent and India's Sensex dropped 1.7 percent despite Asia's third-largest economy picking up pace in the April-June quarter.

Australian shares were down 0.2 percent.

Chinese share prices rose more than 80 percent earlier this year before falling back in mid-August.

The months long rally coincided with unprecedented lending aimed at fighting off the economic downturn.

Many in China believe that a big chunk of the lending found its way into property and share markets, fueling bubbles in asset prices, though the extent to which such funds were illicitly diverted into speculative investments remains unclear.

On Friday, Wall Street ended the week on a down note, with the Dow falling 36.43, or 0.4 percent, to 9,544.20 in somewhat quiet trade.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 2.05, or 0.3 percent, to 1,027.76, while Nasdaq composite index rose 1.04, or 0.1 percent, to 2,028.77.

Monday's fall in Chinese stocks was followed by a dip in crude oil prices, which fell to $71.23, down $1.51, in midday trading European time on the Nymex exchange.

The dollar fell 0.4 percent to 93.15 yen.

The euro traded 0.2 percent lower at $1.4273. - AP

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