Typhoon Noru leaves trail of destruction


The aftermath: A woman saving a chicken as she and other residents evacuate from their submerged homes in San Ildefonso, Bulacan province. — AFP

The strongest typhoon to hit the Philippines this year left at least six people dead, authorities said, after heavy rain and fierce winds battered the country’s most populous island.

Typhoon Noru toppled trees, knocked out power and flooded low-lying communities as it swept across Luzon on Sunday and yesterday.

There have so far been no reports of widespread severe damage from the storm, which hit the country as a super typhoon.

“We were ready for all of this,” President Ferdinand Marcos Jr told a briefing with disaster agencies yesterday.

“You might think that we overdid it. There is no such thing as overkill when it comes to disasters.”

Five rescuers were killed after they were sent to help flooded residents in San Miguel municipality in Bulacan province, near Manila.

“They were deployed by the provincial government to a flooded area,” said Lt-Col Romualdo Andres, chief of police in San Miguel.

He said the rescuers were wading through floodwaters when a wall beside them collapsed, sending them into the fast current.

An elderly man died after he was hit by a landslide in Burdeos municipality on the Polillo islands, part of Quezon province, where the storm made landfall, said Garner Jimenez from the local civil defence office.

The Philippines is regularly ravaged by storms, with scientists warning they are becoming more powerful as the world gets warmer because of climate change.

Noru smashed into the archipelago nation on Sunday after an unprecedented “explosive intensification” in wind speeds, the state weather forecaster said earlier.

It made landfall about 100km northeast of the densely populated capital Manila, before weakening to a typhoon as it crossed a mountain range, coconut plantations and rice fields.

Nearly 75,000 people were evacuated from their homes before the storm hit, as the meteorology agency warned heavy rain could cause “serious flooding” in vulnerable areas, trigger landslides and destroy crops.

But there was no sign of the widespread devastation many had feared, as the storm moved over the South China Sea towards Vietnam.

Burdeos municipality on the Polillo islands bore the brunt of Noru.

Ferocious winds ripped off some roofs and brought down large trees while heavy rain flooded riverside houses, said Ervin Calleja, a 49-year-old teacher.

“It was really worrisome,” he said by phone.

“The wind was whistling and it had heavy rains. That’s the more dangerous part.” — AFP

Article type: free
User access status:
Subscribe now to our Premium Plan for an ad-free and unlimited reading experience!
   

Next In Aseanplus News

Tennis-Auger-Aliassime shines as Canada win first Davis Cup title
Asean News Headlines at 9pm on Sunday (Nov 27, 2022)
Apec, ganja, World Cup football and the weakness of Thai planning
Philippines sees debt-to-GDP ratio falling to 50% by 2028
Vietnam agricultural sector aims to raise organic fertilizer proportion to 25% in 2025
Counter low births by focusing on seniors, says Thai population expert
Singapore firm comes up with world’s first molecular blood test for early detection of gastric cancer
Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei and Thailand in joint bid to grant ‘kebaya’ Unesco heritage status; Indonesia stays out
Budget tabling could double up as confidence vote for Anwar, says Amirudin
Anwar's leadership comes at the right moment, says veteran Thai journalist

Others Also Read