Study: Coronavirus survives on skin five times longer than flu


TOKYO, Oct 18 (AFP): The coronavirus remains active on human skin for nine hours, Japanese researchers have found, in a discovery they said showed the need for frequent hand washing to combat the Covid-19 pandemic.

The pathogen that causes the flu survives on human skin for about 1.8 hours by comparison, said the study published this month in the Clinical Infectious Diseases journal.

"The nine-hour survival of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus strain that causes Covid-19) on human skin may increase the risk of contact transmission in comparison with IAV (influenza A virus), thus accelerating the pandemic," it said.

The research team tested skin collected from autopsy specimens, about one day after death.

Both the coronavirus and the flu virus are inactivated within 15 seconds by applying ethanol, which is used in hand sanitisers.

"The longer survival of SARS-CoV-2 on the skin increases contact-transmission risk; however, hand hygiene can reduce this risk," the study said.

The study backs World Health Organisation guidance for regular and thorough hand washing to limit transmission of the virus, which has infected nearly 40 million people around the world since it first emerged in China late last year. - AFP
Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 18
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

100% readers found this article insightful

Next In Aseanplus News

How RCEP benefits Singaporeans and businesses
No decision yet on KL-Spore high-speed rail: Malaysia
S.Korea foils N. Korea attempt to hack Covid-19 vaccine makers
Indonesia signs coal shipment contract with Chinese traders
Pakistan shelling kills 3 Indian soldiers in Kashmir: India
China has over 700,000 5G base stations: official
Indian firm to make Russia’s Sputnik V Covid-19 vaccine
No year-end bonus for Singapore civil servants
Vietnam returns eight Cambodian women tricked into illegal China work
AstraZeneca likely to run new global trial on Covid-19 vaccine

Stories You'll Enjoy