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Samsung’s Galaxy S8 hits stores


Samsung could break the record 48.5 million unit sales it achieved with its S7 series, according to an analyst. — AFP

Samsung could break the record 48.5 million unit sales it achieved with its S7 series, according to an analyst. — AFP

SEOUL: The world’s biggest smartphone maker Samsung Electronics added more than US$1bil (RM4.40bil) to its market capitalisation on April 21 as investors cheered positive reaction to its new Galaxy S8 and the device went on sale over the counter. 

The device, unveiled in New York last month and a challenge to Apple’s iPhone, is the firm’s first major launch since last year’s withdrawal of the Galaxy Note 7 over exploding batteries. 

But the company’s profits are rising and the new phones have received good reviews, with more than one million pre-orders for the S8 and the larger S8+ in South Korea alone. 

Shares in Samsung Electronics rose 1.2% to close at 2.04mil won (RM7,897) on April 21, adding around 1.3tril won (RM5.03bil) to its total market capitalisation.

A model poses with a Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S8 smartphone during a media event in Seoul, South Korea, April 13, 2017.  REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
The new phones have received good reviews, with more than one million pre-orders for the S8 and the larger S8+ in South Korea alone. — Reuters

”Market reactions to the release of the S8 series are somewhat positive,” said Lee Seung-Woo of IBK Investment Securities. 

Samsung could break the record 48.5 million unit sales it achieved with its S7 series, he added.  

”Barring the weakening of the US dollar, Samsung’s second-quarter operating profit would reach 12 trillion won,” Lee said. 

Pre-order deliveries began earlier this week, and in-store sales began in South Korea on April 21, with the US and Canada to follow suit. The phone is due to be rolled out to around 50 more countries next week.

‘Highly competitive’ 

Samsung Electronics is the flagship subsidiary of the giant Samsung Group, whose revenues are equivalent to a fifth of South Korea’s gross domestic product, and the S8 series introduction comes at a delicate time for the embattled firm. 

The Note 7 recall debacle cost it billions of dollars in lost profit and affected its global reputation and credibility, forcing it to apologise to customers and postpone the S8 launch. 

”The latest salvo from Samsung shows how it’s keen to regain consumer confidence and attain leadership in the smartphone landscape, a nearly saturated but still highly competitive space that remains key to retaining subscriber loyalties and winning new converts,” IHS Markit said. 

When Samsung unveiled Galaxy S8 and S8+ in New York last month, it said the new handsets would mark a “new era of smartphone design”. 

Fitted with screens of 5.8in and 6.2in, the two handsets include Samsung’s upgraded digital assistant Bixby, competing in a crowded field that includes Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa.

Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S8 smartphone is displayed during a media event in Seoul, South Korea, April 13, 2017.  REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
The most striking feature of the new phones is what Samsung dubs an "Infinity Display". — Reuters

The most striking feature of the new phones is what Samsung dubs an “infinity display” – an expanded glass screen that covers the entire front of the device and appears to curve seamlessly around its edges. 

But some consumers have complained that the screens on their devices have a reddish hue. Samsung said in a statement that users could manually adjust the colour range according to their preferences.  

The home button has been replaced with a pressure-sensitive section embedded under the screen, and the water-resistant phone allows for biometric authentication with fingerprint and iris scanners. 

The world’s largest memory chip and smartphone maker has said it expected its operating profit in the January-March period of 9.9tril won (RM38.32bil), up 48.2% from a year earlier, thanks to strong sales of memory chips and display panels. — AFP

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