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Thursday June 4, 2009

Emergency leave

NORMALLY we only summit the emergency letter to the management is on the second day. Please comment on my emergency letter.

Date: 13 March 2009  

To Manager,  

RE: Apply Emergency Leave

I had apply an emergency leave on 12 March 2009 due to my grandmother sick and need my assistant.

I am sorry for the inconvenient caused.

Thank you.

I would appreciate it if you could comment on my letter. Thank you.

– Yean

 

First of all, you have to write “To the Manager” when addressing your manager and on the subject line, write “Application for” instead of “Apply” with no “RE”. before it.

I take it that you are applying for emergency leave the day after you were absent from work.

The first paragraph of your letter should read: “I could not come to work yesterday, 12 March 2009, because I had to attend to a family emergency. My grandmother was ill and needed my attention.”

Then the second paragraph should follow with: “I would therefore like to apply for emergency leave for that date.”

In the third paragraph, you should write “inconvenience” (noun) instead of “inconvenient” (adjective).

Your letter should look something like this, from the date onwards:

Date: 13 March 2009

To the Manager,

Application for Emergency Leave

I could not come to work yesterday, 12 March 2009, because I had to attend to a family emergency. My grandmother was ill and needed my attention.

I would therefore like to apply for emergency leave for that date.

I am sorry for the inconvenience caused.

Thank you.

I would also like to point out the following errors and correct them in your letter to the editor.

In the first sentence, you wrote “summit” when you should have written “submit”. “Summit” is a very different word from “submit.” Also, you don’t need “is” in that sentence.  

In your last sentence, after your letter to your manager, you wrote: “I would appreciated if you could comment this letter.”

This should be corrected to: “I would appreciate it if you could comment on this letter.”

Revert is not reply

I HAVE been wanting to find out if the word “revert” can be used as such:

1) Kindly revert to me by tomorrow morning.

2) Boss, they want to know when we can revert to them with regards to the advertising proposal?

These are some instances where “revert” means “to get back to” or “to provide (answer)”, and it is a widely accepted and used term especially in the media and advertising industry here.

To my knowledge, revert originally means to fall back or go back to the original way/method, as in status quo, i.e., “They had to revert back to the old system because ...”

– Bern

Similar questions about the use of the word “revert” have been asked more than once before in MOE. The use of the word “revert” in each of your sentences 1) and 2) is incorrect.

Sentence 1) should read: “Kindly reply (or get back) to me by tomorrow morning.

Sentence 2) should read: “Boss, they want to know when we can reply (or get back) to them with regard (not “regards”) to the advertising proposal?”

The fact that “it is a widely accepted and used term especially in the media and advertising industry here” does not make “revert to” mean “reply to”, “get back to” or “provide (answer) to” in the English language.

I have scoured several reputable dictionaries of British and American English, including the comprehensive 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary, and nowhere is “revert” defined as “reply” or “revert to” defined as “reply to”, “get back to” or “provide (answer) to” in current or past usage.

“Revert” still means a) “go back to (a former subject of discourse) (OED, meaning 6 a) and b) “go back to a former condition or practice”.

We should never say “revert back”, because the “back” there is redundant.

Here is an example of the use of “revert” with meaning a):

“To revert to what we were discussing before we were interrupted, do you think Roger Federer will win another Grand Slam this year?”

And below are two examples from the Internet of the word “revert” with meaning b). The first example comes from the website of the Bank of England, while the second is from that of Bank Negara Malaysia:

“The model assesses the contribution of investment, acquisitions, cash flows and market-to-book values to the determination of debt, and also the tendency of debt to revert to its optimum level.”

(http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/workingpapers/wp317.pdf )

“ATM services would continue to be provided for at least 5 continuous hours from 7.00am to 12noon. From 1 January 2000 onwards, the ATMs will revert to their normal operating hours from 7.00 a.m. to 11.00 p.m.”

http://www.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=8&pg=14&ac=607

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