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Hisham hands over Transport Ministry duties to Liow


Hishammuddin and Liow in a joint press conference after the handing over of duties at the Transport Ministry.

Hishammuddin and Liow in a joint press conference after the handing over of duties at the Transport Ministry.

PUTRAJAYA: The mission to recover the missing flight MH370 took prominence in the handover of duties at the Transport Ministry between Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein and Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai.

Liow, who has assumed the position of minister, will waste no time and his first agenda of business would involve communication with his Chinese counterpart as early as Monday night to hold talks on the matter.

Plans are also being made for a meeting between Liow and Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search and rescue efforts in Australia.

"Liow will be using the same template that I have worked with- that whatever information that we have received must be corroborated and verified by the necessary experts.

"The four committees led by the relevant deputy ministers will also meet Liow and I on Tuesday," Hishammuddin said in a joint press conference with Liow, here, Monday.

Hishammuddin said both he and Liow have divided their responsibilities on the MH370 search and rescue mission 'quite equally' but added that he will continue to assist Liow until the latter has assimilated comfortably in his new position.

Hishammuddin, who is Defence Minister, had took on the position of acting Transport Minister for slightly over a year until Liow, who is MCA president, was appointed and sworn in as a Cabinet minister at the Istana Negara last week.

Both men have described the handover of duties as a seamless transition.

"I will continue the effort to ensure that the MH370 search and rescue mission is well managed.

"I'll need some time to listen to some of the committee reports and our focus (in a planned visit to Australia) is to get details on the recent search.

"As of now, there are a lot of hearsay but it is better to hear straight from the horse's mouth so that we can convey information to the public accurately," said Liow.

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