Noodle shop still a crowd favourite - Eat & Drink | The Star Online

ADVERTISEMENT

Noodle shop still a crowd favourite


Tucked behind a row of pre-war shophouses in Jalan Yap Ah Loy, Sang Kee serves delicious sang har mee.

Tucked behind a row of pre-war shophouses in Jalan Yap Ah Loy, Sang Kee serves delicious sang har mee.

TUCKED in the back alley behind a row of pre-war shophouses in Jalan Yap Ah Loy is a place where sang har mee is served to city folk.

The tiny zinc-roofed shop has stood in this locality for more than four decades faithfully serving customers, majority of whom are regulars, who have been patronising this eatery for years.

Honestly, this makan place, away from the madding crowd, is not that easy to find.

The only access to this stall is through a narrow dirty lane in between two blocks of pre-war buildings.

A buddy and I decided to visit this place recently, after a lapse of over a decade.

To our surprise, it has not changed since our last visit except for the big tree, that was missing, in front of the stall that had made way for more seating space for the crowd.

So what is so good about the noodles here?

Sang Kee is crowded during lunch time with workers from the nearby offices.
Sang Kee is crowded during lunch time with workers from the nearby offices.

The sang har mee, made from a combination of crispy yee mee topped with richly flavoured egg-and-prawn roe gravy, pieces of ginger and vegetables, still proves to be irresistible.

Although it was not prepared by the original cook – Wong San, who was on a break with his wife to tour China – his son, Wong Chee Man, who whipped up the dish for us, exhibited the same skill as his father.

The version of sang har mee found here is a bit drier while the freshwater prawns that come along with the meal was fresh.

The cook prepares the prawns perfectly, leaving the butterflied giant prawn’s white flesh, that is still attached to the shell, crunchy.

The right amount of ginger added to the gravy not only gives a nice aroma to the dish but indirectly neutralises the smell of the prawns.

What I like about Sang Kee is that the kitchen is located upfront instead of being hidden away in the back, so one can see perfectly well the way the dish is prepared and cooked.

Chee Man learning the rope from his father to take over Sang Kee which had been operating in the last 40 years.
Chee Man learning the ropes from his father to take over Sang Kee which had been operating in the last 40 years.

Of course, the secret to its creamy taste is the wok hei (cooking over high heat) and how the cook skilfully handles his wok, tossing and mixing the ingredients with a flick of his wrist while pouring the whipped egg mixture into the boiling sauce. The sang har mee is best eaten as soon as it is served.

However, one must be prepared to burn a hole in the pocket when ordering this dish as giant freshwater prawns are expensive.

A meal for two can cost over RM90.

One can opt for regular-size sea prawns instead, for a cheaper meal. This version of sang har mee priced at about RM25 for two, comes with slices of pork and pork liver.

Oh yes, this place is crowded during lunch time with workers from nearby offices. As such, go early.

It is also difficult to get parking, so the best way to get there is by taxi, LRT or MRT, although you have to walk a bit from the Central Market or Masjid Jamek LRT stations. But it is definitely worth the time!

Sang Kee, which is open from 11am to 3pm, is located at No.5, Lorong Yap Ah Loy, Kuala Lumpur. For details, call 019-373 9135.

Central Region , Street grub , sang har mee , KL

ADVERTISEMENT