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Urban farm flourishes in Shah Alam


The community farm in Section 24 Setia, Shah Alam, features carefully planned plots of vegetables that have been divided into two categories – for personal consumption and for commercial sales.

The community farm in Section 24 Setia, Shah Alam, features carefully planned plots of vegetables that have been divided into two categories – for personal consumption and for commercial sales.

EVERY morning, the sound of laughter and cangkul hitting the earth can be heard at the Community Garden in Section 24 Setia, Shah Alam.

The garden has become the passion of a group of retirees who started it two years ago.

Today, the urban farm in the heart of the city is a lush, self-sustaining project, thanks to the hard work and love they have put in.

One of the 10 community farms registered with MBSA, the Section 24 green space began as a trial and error escapade.
One of the 10 community farms registered with MBSA, the Section 24 green space began as a trial and error escapade.

The sight of abandoned land owned by Shah Alam City Council (MBSA) going to waste prompted Section 24 Setia Residents Association chairman Ismail Mat and his team to clean up the area with the active encouragement of their councillor Awang Ibrahim.

“Some 80 residents turned up to help clear the land and it was not easy. We used the funding Awang gave us to start,” he said.

Awang added that the idea was partly sparked by a visit he organised to Sabak Bernam.

The 0.14ha garden is one of the 10 community farms registered with MBSA.

Residents in Section 24 Setia have all their farm records in order and often review them together with MBSA staff.
Residents in Section 24 Setia have all their farm records in order and often review them together with MBSA staff.

Farm chairman Ramli Mohd Salleh said all of them were urbanites with little or no knowledge about growing plants but they educated themselves.

The fruits of their labour can be clearly seen in the plots of vegetables that have been divided for personal consumption and commercial sale.

“We even have an irrigation system built by the residents. We also make our own organic fertiliser from vegetable and fruit scraps,” added Ramli.

They use brown sugar to speed up the composting process and chicken faeces is used as well.

The urban farmers are also planning to rear catfish using the hydroponic method.

Retirees, old folk and housewives are the ones who often tend to the community farm in Jalan Tuntung, Section 20, Shah Alam.
Retirees, old folk and housewives are the ones who often tend to the community farm in Jalan Tuntung, Section 20, Shah Alam.

Some 3,000 fish will be reared in six tanks as fertiliser and for sale at their weekly market.

Residents may take the produce on the designated residents’ plots for their own consumption but those growing on commercial ones are meant to be sold at the market, which is held every Wednesday and Saturday in Jalan Kangkung Puteri 24/7, from 9am to 11am.

The produce are much cheaper than the ones at the pasar tani or wet markets in Shah Alam. For example, a papaya could cost as low as RM1. Other produce include bananas, chillies and fresh herbs.

There are more than 30 types of plants, vegetables and fruits grown in the Section 20 community farm.
There are more than 30 types of plants, vegetables and fruits grown in the Section 20 community farm.

Another community garden in Jalan Tuntung, Section 20, has sprung up on 1ha of land designated for MBSA’s staff quarters.

It is also run by retirees and about 63 houses are located here, compared to 217 in Section 24 Setia.

The head of the farm Abdullah A. Hamid said working adults and teenagers also helped out after work or during weekends.

“However, it is the retirees and older folk who spend most of their time tending to the garden and selling the produce,” he added.

There are six plots for individuals as well as communities but everything is shared equally.

Abdullah said the individual plots, although marked with specific names, are tended to by everyone.

The Jalan Tuntung Section 20 farm organises a Farm Day sale every Tuesday morning. Residents from neighbouring areas often stop by to buy the fruits and vegetables.
The Jalan Tuntung Section 20 farm organises a Farm Day sale every Tuesday morning. Residents from neighbouring areas often stop by to buy the fruits and vegetables.

They grow more than 30 types of plants and vegetables and there is also a dedicated herb garden with a fresh ulam selection.

The vegetables and fruits produced here are quite big, making them ideal as seedlings.

Their bestseller is the Roselle plant, which housewives in the community use to make jam as well as juice.

The residents make about RM400 a month selling their produce through Farm Day sales held every Tuesday morning.

The bestseller for the Jalan Tuntung Section 20 farm is the Roselle plant, which is used to make jam and juice.
The bestseller for the Jalan Tuntung Section 20 farm is the Roselle plant, which is used to make jam and juice.

Residents are allowed to take whatever vegetables and fruits they want and but are encouraged to give a token sum.

“We use the money to buy kitchen and gardening equipment and other things for the residents associations and the farm,” said Abdullah.

However, they are facing manpower issues to manage such a large garden.

Abdullah said while the pensioners put in a lot of time, it is still difficult to maintain because of time and weather constraints.

“Most of the time, it rains in the evening so people are unable to come and help out.

“We also need a machine to help us plough,” he added, saying they hope to raise funds to buy suitable machinery.

 

Related story:

MBSA welcomes applications for community farm

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