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Published: Wednesday March 5, 2014 MYT 8:36:06 PM
Updated: Wednesday March 5, 2014 MYT 8:36:06 PM

West presses Iran to address suspected atomic bomb research

VIENNA (Reuters) - Western powers pressed Iran on Wednesday to tackle suspicions that it may have worked on designing an atomic bomb and the United States said the issue would be central to the success of talks on a final settlement over Tehran's nuclear programme.

At a board meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Washington and the European Union underlined their support for the U.N. watchdog's efforts to investigate long-running allegations of possible nuclear arms research by Iran.

The IAEA inquiry is separate from but complementary to higher-level political talks between Iran and six world powers aimed at a deal on the overall scope of Tehran's nuclear energy programme to ensure it cannot be diverted into bombmaking.

In potentially a significant advance for the IAEA's inquiry into Iran's nuclear research, Tehran agreed last month to address one of many topics the U.N. agency wants answers on - fast-acting detonators that can be used for nuclear explosions.

But while this was welcomed by Western officials at the closed-door session of the IAEA's 35-nation governing board in Vienna, they made clear the Islamic Republic must do much more.

The U.S. ambassador to the IAEA, Joseph Macmanus, said it remained critical for Iran to address substantively all international concerns about the so-called possible military dimensions (PMD) of the country's nuclear programme.

A "satisfactory resolution of PMD issues will be critical to any long-term comprehensive solution to the Iranian nuclear issue," Macmanus said, according to a copy of his statement.

He later told reporters: "I don't think there is a question that it is being raised and will continue to be central to a comprehensive solution."

The 28-nation European Union voiced a similar line in its statement: "We urge Iran to cooperate fully with the agency regarding PMD issues, and to provide the agency with access to all people, documents and sites requested."

Iran denies Western allegations that it is seeking to develop the capability to make atomic arms, saying its nuclear programme is a peaceful project to produce electricity.

EU'S ASHTON TO VISIT TEHRAN

Also in Vienna on Wednesday, experts from Iran and the powers - the United States, Russia, France, Britain, Germany and Britain - began a meeting to prepare for the next round of political-level talks on March 17 in the Austrian capital. Diplomats said Russia would take part in the meeting, suggesting no apparent immediate fallout in the Iran negotiations because of the crisis over Ukraine.

"The overriding commitment is one of working together to resolve the Iran nuclear programme and there are many other issues in the world that will continue to cause us to have disagreements and debates and sometimes to find ourselves in opposition to one another," Macmanus said when asked whether tensions over Ukraine could disrupt the Iran talks.

Iran and the powers are aiming to build on a breakthrough deal reached late last year in Geneva under which Tehran agreed to curb parts of its nuclear programme in exchange for some easing of sanctions that are battering its economy.

The six-month agreement focused mainly on preventing Tehran obtaining nuclear fissile material to assemble a future bomb, rather than on whether Iran sought to develop nuclear weapons technology in the past, which the IAEA is investigating.

Western diplomats and nuclear experts say the IAEA needs to carry out its inquiry to establish what happened and to be able to provide assurances that any "weaponisation" work - expertise to turn fissile material into a functioning bomb - has ceased.

But it is unclear to what extent it will form part of any final settlement between Iran and the powers - which unlike the IAEA can lift crippling sanctions on the major oil producer and therefore have more leverage in dealing with Tehran.

In Brussels, officials said EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton - who is coordinating the nuclear negotiations with Iran on behalf of the six powers - would travel to Tehran on Saturday for a two-day visit.

Topics would include Syria's civil war, human rights in Iran and the nuclear dispute. She is due to meet several senior officials, including Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.

(Additional reporting by Justyna Pawlak in Brussels, editing by Mark Heinrich)

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