X Close

World

Published: Thursday January 9, 2014 MYT 7:25:02 AM
Updated: Thursday January 9, 2014 MYT 7:25:02 AM

Tunisia's assembly appoints key electoral council

Members of the Tunisian parliament cast their vote over the composition of an election commission that will oversee a vote later this year in Tunis January 8, 2014. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

Members of the Tunisian parliament cast their vote over the composition of an election commission that will oversee a vote later this year in Tunis January 8, 2014. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

TUNIS (Reuters) - Tunisia's national assembly appointed an electoral council on Wednesday to oversee elections this year, a key step in the country's transition to democracy three years after its "Arab Spring" uprising.

Selecting the nine-member electoral council was a key part of an agreement to overcome months of political crisis between the ruling Islamist party, Ennahda, and its secular opposition over how to shape the country's young democracy.

"Congratulations to the Tunisian people for the election of these nine members. It was a tough task, but we have overcome differences," Meherzia Laabidi, deputy president of the assembly, said at the end of voting.

Under the deal brokered late last year to end deadlock, Tunisia's government plans to resign shortly and hand over power to a non-political caretaker cabinet that will govern until new elections later this year.

Three years after its popular uprising ousted autocratic leader Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, the North African country is in the final stages of establishing a full democracy that is seen as a model for the region.

National assembly members are also voting on the last clauses of a new constitution, and the government and opposition have already agreed on a caretaker prime minister, Mehdi Jomaa, an engineer and former minister.

Tunisia's young democracy was threatened after the assassination of two secular opposition leaders last year by militant Islamist gunmen, forcing the country into a deadlock between Ennahda and opposition parties.

After months of protests, though, Ennahda agreed to step down, but only once the government and mostly secular opposition finished the constitution, set a date for elections and named an electoral commission.

Despite its tensions, Tunisia has fared better than Egypt, Yemen and Libya, who have struggled more with violence and instability since their revolts against their own long-standing autocratic leaders.

(Reporting by Aziz El Yaakoubi. Writing by Patrick Markey; Editing by G Crosse and Andre Grenon)

advertisement

  1. Lorry slams into cars, catches fire at Sunway toll booth on Kesas Highway
  2. MH17: Najib's 'silent diplomatic' approach worked, says NYT
  3. MH17: Opposition leaders laud Najib's quiet diplomacy
  4. Kiki fined RM5,000 for causing mischief and damage
  5. MH17: Malaysia receives black boxes from Ukrainian rebels
  6. MH17: Black boxes to be handed over to Malaysia, says Najib
  7. Why did these children have to die?
  8. MH17: Russian Ambassador to Malaysia speaks up
  9. MH17: Dutch father - 'Thank you for killing my daughter'
  10. Iconic A&W outlet in PJ to be demolished

advertisement

advertisement