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Published: Saturday December 14, 2013 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Saturday December 14, 2013 MYT 8:40:08 AM

Haiyan death toll tops 6,000 making it Philippines' deadliest recorded typhoon

Hungry beasts: Giraffes being fed at Calauit Game Preserve and Wildlife Sanctuary in Calauit island, Busuanga province, western Philippines. Giraffes and zebras were badly injured and left with almost no food after typhoon Haiyan. — AFP

Hungry beasts: Giraffes being fed at Calauit Game Preserve and Wildlife Sanctuary in Calauit island, Busuanga province, western Philippines. Giraffes and zebras were badly injured and left with almost no food after typhoon Haiyan. — AFP

MANILA: The number of people dead after one of the world’s strongest typhoons struck the Philippines has risen above 6,000, the government said, with nearly 2,000 others still missing.

Five weeks after Super Typhoon Haiyan destroyed entire towns across the nation’s central islands, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council put the official death toll at 6,009, making it the Philippines’ deadliest recorded typhoon.

The council said it is still looking for 1,779 missing people amid an international relief and rehabilitation effort covering a large devastated area about the size of Portugal.

The number of people confirmed dead or unaccounted for continues to rise steadily. On Nov 23, more than two weeks after the storm struck, officials put the death toll at 5,235 and listed 1,613 people as still missing.

The latest official count puts Haiyan nearly on par with a 1976 tsunami in the southern Philippines, generated by a major undersea earthquake in the Moro Gulf, that left between 5,000 and 8,000 people dead.

The Haiyan toll has already surpassed Tropical Storm Thelma, which unleashed floods that killed more than 5,100 people in the central city of Ormoc in 1991, previously the country’s deadliest storm.

The government said more than four million people lost their homes to either Haiyan’s 315kph winds or tsunami-like storm surges, and some would continue to need food aid as well as shelters and jobs.

As part of the international aid effort, an Indonesian official who rebuilt Aceh after the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was in the Philippines yesterday to help the neighbouring country recover from the typhoon.

Senior Minister Kuntoro Mangkusubroto visited Tacloban at the Philippine government’s invitation to provide insights on managing large-scale recovery programmes, the United Nations Development Programme said. — AFP

Tags / Keywords: world

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