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Published: Wednesday June 25, 2014 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Wednesday June 25, 2014 MYT 7:57:28 AM

Sting in the hot, dry weather

Recuperating: Dengue patients receiving treatment at the Penang General Hospital. Aedes mosquitoes tend to bite more during the hot and dry days and the public is advised to take precautions from being bitten.

Recuperating: Dengue patients receiving treatment at the Penang General Hospital. Aedes mosquitoes tend to bite more during the hot and dry days and the public is advised to take precautions from being bitten.

PETALING JAYA: The Aedes mosquito is more aggressive and bites more frequently in hot and dry weather, according to a dengue expert.

Prof Dr Sazaly Abu Bakar, who is with the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Arbovirus Research and Reference at Univer­siti Malaya, said the lack of water makes the mosquitoes more aggressive.

“They will breed and grow faster although their life cycle will be shorter and they will bite more often,” he warned.

He said many people would leave the doors and windows open in the hot weather, enabling mosquitoes to enter their homes more easily.

“They should protect themselves by putting mesh screens over doors and windows,” he said.

Dr Sazaly said there had been a spike in dengue cases at the Universiti Malaya Specialist Centre, with about 300 recorded per week last month, similar to the peak in cases recorded in March.

He advised people to stay indoors during dusk and dawn and use mosquito repellent when outdoors.

“People should wear light-coloured clothing as dark colours attract mosquitoes,” he added.

Dr Sazaly said homes and the surroundings should be checked for containers or places where there was stagnant water.

“During the hot and dry season, any pool of water left by rain attracts mosquitoes to breed.

“Aedes mosquitoes can even breed in an amount of water the size of a 20 sen coin,” he said.

He also advised the public with family members running a high fever to take extra precaution because the Aedes mosquito could spread dengue if it sucked blood from the sick person and then bit another.

Related stories:

Subra: Clean up dengue spots and store water carefully

Hospitals recording high number of dengue cases

Dry weather to likely bring hazier situation in Peninsular Malaysia

Cabinet to announce measures to deal with El Nino

Rise in number of patients being admitted for dengue

Patients treated with care despite congestion at hospital

Tags / Keywords: Health, Family & Community, Current Aedes cycle more aggressive

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