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Published: Tuesday November 26, 2013 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Tuesday November 26, 2013 MYT 6:52:55 AM

Individuals can't have Airsoft or paintball guns

Sticking to their guns: Comm Zulkifli (centre) holding up a paintball marker during the press conference. With him is Supt Norsiah (left).

Sticking to their guns: Comm Zulkifli (centre) holding up a paintball marker during the press conference. With him is Supt Norsiah (left).

KUALA LUMPUR: Airsoft and paintball enthusiasts hoping to legally keep their guns will be disappointed – the police are sticking to their guns that such sporting equipment are licensed only to registered operators and clubs.

Police gave a month from yesterday for owners to surrender their unlicensed airsoft guns and paintball markers.

No action will be taken against those who surrender their guns to the nearest district police headquarters within the grace period, said Bukit Aman logistics director Comm Datuk Zulkifli Abdullah.

Those found to be still in possession of the arms after the deadline can be jailed for up to a year, and fined up to RM5,000, or both.

Children aged below 14 years are exempted from this law.

Comm Zulkifli said applications to own and use imitation arms would be considered for registered companies with solid finances and paid-up capital of no less than RM400,000 or sports clubs that are registered and recognised by the Sports Commissioner’s office.

“Those who are unlicensed but fulfil these requirements may submit their applications to own the guns for sporting purposes, according to Section 4 of the Arms Act.

“Applications for individual ow­­ners will not be entertained,” he told a press conference here yesterday.

Comm Zulkifli said shooting was gaining popularity as a sport and had to be regulated to avoid abuse.

He added that the tight regulations for ownership and use were to protect the public and discourage the use of such arms in extortion and robbery.

The punishment for such crimes is jail for up to 10 years and three strokes of the rotan.

“According to the Arms Act 1960, imitation guns mean anything which has the appearance or is intended to give the impression of being a firearm.

“Toy guns are easier to identify, with just one look you can tell if it is real or not,” he said.

Since last year, the police have investigated 47 cases of possessing unlicensed imitation arms, like paintball markers, airsoft guns and BB guns.

Comm Zulkifli said 29 people have been charged under Section 36(1) of the Arms Act. Two have been convicted and jailed two months, he added.

For enquiries, call Bukit Aman licensing officer Supt Norsiah Mohd Saaduddin at 03-2266 1041/1042.

Tags / Keywords: Courts & Crime, imitation arms, license, airsoft, paintball

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