Viewpoints

Tipsy-Turvy

Published: Saturday August 16, 2014 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Saturday August 16, 2014 MYT 9:06:21 PM

Cool in a koozie

A beer would normally stay cold inside a Huggaz koozie for about 30 minutes.

A beer would normally stay cold inside a Huggaz koozie for about 30 minutes.

Our columnist decides to find out once and for all how useful a beer koozie actually is.

Picture this: You’re sitting by a poolside in some beach somewhere, enjoying the cool sea breeze and the warm sunshine, and you reach out for that nice, cold beer beside you to take a sip.... and find out that it’s not cold anymore. Urgh.

Now, wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to make sure your nice, ice cold beer didn’t get warm too quickly, and could stay cold at least until you finished it?

While I am fully aware that not ALL beers should be drunk ice cold (in fact, some ales and stouts taste even better when slightly warmer), it CAN get quite annoying when your beer gets warm way too quickly, before you even get the chance to finish it.

Well, short of bringing your own refrigerator or an ice-box around with you, there’s always the simple yet useful beer koozie, also known as a beer sleeve, beer condom, beer cozy, beer hugger, and in Australia, a stubby.

A koozie is usually made out of foam or fabric, and its primary purpose is to keep your cold beer cold by insulating your bottle or can from heat, which in the hot Malaysian weather, can be quite brutal on your beer, wine, or heck, any sort of cold beverage that doesn’t require ice.

Cool koozies: Huggaz produces colourful, creatively designed koozies for cans and bottles, as well as wine bottles.
Huggaz produces colourful, creatively designed koozies for cans and bottles, as well as wine bottles. 

So, how well do these things work, really? To find out, I decided to conduct a test with Huggaz, a recently launched brand that produces koozies for cans and bottles, as well as wine bottles (single or double).

But first, some rather obvious disclaimers. First of all, these only work on the bottles and cans. If you’re pouring your beers out into a glass, then it rather defeats the purpose of the koozie in the first place (though with the wine ones, you can at least keep your wine chilled in the koozie as you drink).

Also, since these are just to slow down the heating process, you can’t expect the beer to stay cold FOREVER, no matter how good the koozie is.

“A beer would normally stay cold inside a Huggaz koozie for about 30 minutes, while wine would stay cool for about 45 minutes to an hour,” said Huggaz marketing director Deepak Gill. “Unprotected beers warm up way too quick in our weather, but these can help slow that process down.”

True enough, after trying it out on a couple of beers (both can and bottle) that had been kept overnight in the refrigerator, I found that the beers actually stayed cold for about 20 minutes before gradually becoming cooler, but still drinkable within 30 minutes. By 45 minutes, it was already almost at room temperature (though really, if you’re still nursing that same beer by that point, you might want to think about whether you even LIKE beer in the first place).

Another obvious advantage of having a koozie is that you don’t have to worry about the beer “sweating” (forming condensation outside the bottle as it warms), and getting everything wet.

With its eye-catching and colourful designs, Huggaz koozies stand out for me. Also, while most beer huggers are made of soft foam, Huggaz use high-quality neoprene, a flexible and durable synthetic rubber compound that is also the efficient insulation material used for scuba suits. Huggaz products have a minimum neoprene thickness of 3.5mm, which makes them foldable, and are also machine-washable and stretchable.

According to Deepak, Huggaz is also able to produce customised koozies for celebrations like weddings and birthdays, or corporate gifts.

“Next, we’re looking at bringing in other products like colourful and trendy ice boxes, as well as foldable ice bags and lunch boxes,” he said.

Huggaz products are currently online at huggaz.com, or at selected outlets including Mish Mash (Jalan Muntri, Georgetown, Pulau Pinang); The Food Company (Taman Tun Dr Ismail, KL), Ben’s Independent Grocer (Publika Solaris Dutamas), Shiraz (SS3, Petaling Jaya), and Village Grocer at Bangsar Village 1, KL.

Prices range between RM10 and RM35 per item. For more information, visit facebook.com/huggaz.

> Michael Cheang wants a Huggaz that looks like an Alien face hugger.

Tags / Keywords: Tipsy-Turvy, beer, koozie, Huggaz

More Articles

Filter by

A beer would normally stay cold inside a Huggaz koozie for about 30 minutes.

Cool in a koozie

16 August 2014

Our columnist decides to find out once and for all how useful a beer koozie actually is.

Magnificent: Seven different expressions of Kavalan Taiwanese single malt whisky are curently available in Malaysia. - Photos by SIA HONG KIAU/The Star

Sharing with angels

2 August 2014

Our columnist tries some Kavalan whisky, and discovers why the angels in Taiwan are having such a good time.

Carlsberg Malaysia recently launched the Somersby Pear Cider to complement their increasingly popular apple cider. - SAMUEL ONG / THE STAR

The merry perry aka pear cider

19 July 2014

Our columnist has fruits on his mind as he compares pear and apple ciders.

Hops used to make beer.

Hooray for India Pale Ale!

5 July 2014

Known for its bitter, hoppy flavours, IPA is one of the fastest growing beer categories in the world right now.

Rise of Ruinart

31 May 2014

ESTABLISHED in 1729 by Nicolas Ruinart, the House of Ruinart (pronouced Ruin-ar, without the T) is the oldest established Champagne house in the world.

The Q to Z of beer

31 May 2014

Previously, we covered the A to P of beer. The lesson ... hic! ... continues ... hic!

Family-run: The Benromach Distillery is one of the smallest working distilleries in Scotland. (Right) The distillery's flagship expression is the Benromach 10 Year Old.- MICHAEL CHEANG/The Star

Size doesn't matter

31 May 2014

The second smallest working distillery in Scotland, Benromach, is big on flavour and tradition.

The A-Z of beer

17 May 2014

For his first column on Saturdays, our columnist decides to go back to the basics of beer.

Martinis: Shaken and stirred

4 May 2014

Staying on the subject of vermouth, our columnist explores the different connotations of the word ‘martini’.

Discovering the vexing vermouth

20 April 2014

Our columnist ventures forth to discover more about the popular fortified wine.

advertisement

Recent Posts

advertisement